Supply Chain Inventory Management Chapter 9 Copyright 2013

Supply Chain Inventory Management Chapter 9 Copyright 2013

Supply Chain Inventory Management Chapter 9 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 01 What is a Inventory Management? Inventory Management The planning and controlling of inventories in order to meet the competitive priorities of the organization. Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 02 Inventory and Supply Chains Inventory A stock of materials

used to satisfy customer demand or to support the production of services or goods. Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 03 Inventory and Supply Chains Input flow of materials Inventory level Scrap flow Output flow of materials Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 04 Pressures for Small Inventories

Inventory holding cost Cost of capital Storage and handling costs Taxes Insurance Shrinkage Pilferage Obsolescence Deterioration Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 05 Pressures for Large Inventories Customer service Ordering cost Setup cost

Labor and equipment utilization Transportation cost Payments to suppliers Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 06 Types of Inventory Raw materials Work-in-process Finished goods Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 07 Types of Inventory Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 08 Types of Inventory

Cycle Inventory Safety Stock Inventory Anticipation Inventory Pipeline Inventory Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 09 Cycle Inventory Lot sizing principles 1. The lot size, Q, varies directly with the elapsed time (or cycle) between orders. 2. The longer the time between orders for a given item, the greater the cycle inventory must be. Q+0 Q Average cycle inventory = = 2 2 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 10

Pipeline Inventory Average demand during lead time = DL Average demand per period = d Number of periods in the items lead time = L Pipeline inventory = DL = dL Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 11 Example 9.1 A plant makes monthly shipments of electric drills to a wholesaler in average lot sizes of 280 drills. The wholesalers average demand is 70 drills a week, and the lead time from the plant is 3 weeks. The wholesaler must pay for the inventory from the moment the plant makes a shipment. If the wholesaler is willing to increase its purchase quantity to 350 units, the plant will give priority to the wholesaler and guarantee a lead time of only 2 weeks. What is the effect on the wholesalers cycle and pipeline inventories?

Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 12 Example 9.1 The wholesalers current cycle and pipeline inventories are Q Cycle inventory = 2 = 140 drills (70 drills/week)(3 weeks) = 210 drills Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 13 Inventory Reduction Tactics Cycle inventory Reduce the lot size

Reduce ordering and setup costs and allow Q to be reduced Increase repeatability to eliminate the need for changeover Safety stock inventory Place orders closer to the time when they must be received Improve demand forecasts Cut lead times Reduce supply chain uncertainty Rely more on equipment and labor buffers Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 14 Inventory Reduction Tactics Anticipation inventory

Match demand rate with production rates Add new products with different demand cycles Provide off-season promotional campaigns Offer seasonal pricing plans Pipeline inventory Reduce lead times Find more responsive suppliers and select new carriers Change Q in those cases where the lead time depends on the lot size Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 15 What is an ABC Analysis? 100 ABC Analysis Percentage of dollar value

The planning and controlling of inventories in order to meet the competitive priorities of the organization. 90 Class C Class B Class A 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Percentage of SKUs Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 16 Economic Order Quantity The lot size, Q, that minimizes total annual inventory holding and ordering costs Five assumptions Demand rate is constant and known with certainty. No constraints are placed on the size of each lot. The only two relevant costs are the inventory holding cost and the fixed cost per lot for ordering or setup. Decisions for one item can be made independently of decisions for other items. The lead time is constant and known with certainty. Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 17 Economic Order Quantity Dont use the EOQ Make-to-order strategy Order size is constrained Modify the EOQ

Quantity discounts Replenishment not instantaneous Use the EOQ Make-to-stock Carrying and setup costs are known and relatively stable Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 18 Calculating EOQ Receive order Inventory depletion (demand rate) On-hand inventory (units) Q Average

cycle inventory Q 2 1 cycle Time Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 19 Calculating EOQ Annual holding cost Annual holding cost = (Average cycle inventory) (Unit holding cost) Annual ordering cost Annual ordering cost =(Number of orders/Year) (Ordering or setup costs)

Total annual cycle inventory cost Total costs = Annual holding cost + Annual ordering or setup cost Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 20 Annual cost (dollars) Calculating EOQ Total cost Holding cost Ordering cost Lot Size (Q) Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 21 Calculating EOQ Total annual cycle-inventory cost

C= Q (H) + 2 D (S) Q where C = total annual cycle-inventory cost Q = lot size H = holding cost per unit per year D = annual demand S = ordering or setup costs per lot Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 22 Example 9.2 A museum of natural history opened a gift shop which operates 52 weeks per year.

Top-selling SKU is a bird feeder. Sales are 18 units per week, the supplier charges $60 per unit. Ordering cost is $45. Annual holding cost is 25 percent of a feeders value. Management chose a 390-unit lot size. What is the annual cycle-inventory cost of the current policy of using a 390-unit lot size? Would a lot size of 468 be better? Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 23 Example 9.2 We begin by computing the annual demand and holding cost as D= (18 units/week)(52 weeks/year) = 936 units H= 0.25($60/unit) = $15 The total annual cycle-inventory cost for the current policy is Q D 390

936 ($15) + ($45) C = 2 (H) + Q (S) = 2 390 = $2,925 + $108 = $3,033 The total annual cycle-inventory cost for the alternative lot size is 936 468 ($15) + ($45) = $3,510 + $90 = $3,600 C= 468 2 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 24 Example 9.2 Current

cost Annual cost (dollars) 3000 Q Total D = (H) + (S) cost Q 2 2000 Holding cost = Q (H) 2 1000

Ordering cost = Lowest cost D (S) Q 0 | | | 50 100 150 Best Q

(EOQ) | | 200 250 Lot Size (Q) | | | 300 350 400 Current Q

Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 25 Calculating EOQ The EOQ formula: EOQ = 2DS H Time Between Orders (TBO): TBOEOQ = EOQ (12 months/year) D Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 26

Example 9.3 For the bird feeders in Example 9.1, calculate the EOQ and its total annual cycle-inventory cost. How frequently will orders be placed if the EOQ is used? Using the formulas for EOQ and annual cost, we get EOQ = 2DS = H 2(936)(45) = 74.94 or 75 units 15 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 27 Example 9.3 Below shows that the total annual cost is much less than the $3,033 cost of the current policy of placing 390-unit orders. Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 28 Example 9.3 When the EOQ is used, the TBO can be expressed in various ways for the same time period. TBOEOQ = EOQ 75 = = 0.080 year D 936 TBOEOQ = EOQ D (12 months/year) = 75

(12) = 0.96 month 936 TBOEOQ = EOQ D (52 weeks/year) = 75 (52) = 4.17 weeks 936 TBOEOQ = EOQ D (365 days/year) = 75 (365) = 29.25 days

936 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 29 Application 9.1 Suppose that you are reviewing the inventory policies on an $80 item stocked at a hardware store. The current policy is to replenish inventory by ordering in lots of 360 units. Additional information is: D = 60 units per week, or 3,120 units per year S = $30 per order H = 25% of selling price, or $20 per unit per year What is the EOQ? EOQ = 2DS H = 2(3,120)(30) = 97 units

20 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 30 Application 9.1 What is the total annual cost of the current policy (Q = 360), and how does it compare with the cost with using the EOQ? Current Policy EOQ Policy Q = 360 units Q = 97 units C = (360/2)(20) + (3,120/360)(30) C = (97/2)(20) + (3,120/97) (30)

C = 3,600 + 260 C = 970 + 965 C = $3,860 C = $1,935 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 9- 31 Application 9.1 What is the time between orders (TBO) for the current policy and the EOQ policy, expressed in weeks? TBO360 = 360 (52 weeks per year) = 6 weeks 3,120 TBOEOQ =

97 (52 weeks per year) = 1.6 weeks 3,120 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 9- 32 Managerial Insights SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF THE EOQ Parameter EOQ Parameter EOQ Change Change Demand Order/ Setup Costs Holding Costs 2DS

H 2DS H 2DS H Comments Increase in lot size is in proportion to the square root of D.

Weeks of supply decreases and inventory turnover increases because the lot size decreases. Larger lots are justified when holding costs decrease. Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 9- 33 Inventory Control Systems Two important questions: How much? When? Nature of demand Independent demand

Dependent demand Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 34 Inventory Control Systems Continuous review (Q) system Reorder point system (ROP) and fixed order quantity system For independent demand items Tracks inventory position (IP) Includes scheduled receipts (SR), on-hand inventory (OH), and back orders (BO) Inventory position = On-hand inventory + Scheduled receipts Backorders IP = OH + SR BO Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 35 Selecting the Reorder Point

IP IP On-hand inventory Order received Order received Q Order received Q OH OH IP

Order received Q OH R Order placed Order placed L TBO Order placed L TBO L

Time TBO Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 36 Application 9.2 The on-hand inventory is only 10 units, and the reorder point R is 100. There are no backorders and one open order for 200 units. Should a new order be placed? IP = OH + SR BO = 10 + 200 0 = 210 R = 100 Decision: Place NO new order Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 37 Example 9.4

Demand for chicken soup at a supermarket is always 25 cases a day and the lead time is always 4 days. The shelves were just restocked with chicken soup, leaving an on-hand inventory of only 10 cases. No backorders currently exist, but there is one open order in the pipeline for 200 cases. What is the inventory position? Should a new order be placed? R = Total demand during lead time = (25)(4) = 100 cases IP = OH + SR BO = 10 + 200 0 = 210 cases Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 38 nt Continuous Review Systems Selecting the reorder point with variable demand and constant lead time = Average demand during lead time + Safety stock

= dL + safety stock where d = average demand per week (or day or months) L = constant lead time in weeks (or days or months) Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 39 Continuous Review Systems IP Order received On-hand inventory Order received IP

IP Order received Order received Q Q Q R Order placed Order placed Order placed

0 L1 TBO1 L2 TBO2 L3 Time TBO3 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 40 Reorder Point Choose an appropriate service-level policy Select service level or cycle service level Protection interval

Determine the demand during lead time probability distribution Determine the safety stock and reorder point levels Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 41 Demand During Lead Time Specify mean and standard deviation Standard deviation of demand during lead time dLT = d2L = d L Safety stock and reorder point Safety stock = zdLT where z = number of standard deviations needed to achieve the cycle-service level dLT = stand deviation of demand during lead time

Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 42 Demand During Lead Time t = 15 t = 15 t = 15 + = + 75 75 75

Demand for week 1 Demand for week 2 Demand for week 3 t = 25.98 225 Demand for 3-week lead time Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 43 Demand During Lead Time Cycle-service level = 85% Probability of stockout (1.0 0.85 = 0.15) Average demand during

lead time R zdLT Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 44 Example 9.5 Let us return to the bird feeder in Example 9.3. The EOQ is 75 units. Suppose that the average demand is 18 units per week with a standard deviation of 5 units. The lead time is constant at two weeks. Determine the safety stock and reorder point if management wants a 90 percent cycle-service level. order point Safety stock = zdLT = 1.28(7.07) = 9.05 or 9 units

= d L + Safety stock = 2(18) + 9 = 45 units Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 45 Application 9.3 Suppose that the demand during lead time is normally distributed with an average of 85 and dLT = 40. Find the safety stock, and reorder point R, for a 95 percent cycle-service level. Safety stock = zdLT = 1.645(40) = 65.8 or 66 units R = Average demand during lead time + Safety stock R = 85 + 66 = 151 units Find the safety stock, and reorder point R, for an 85 percent cycle-service level. Safety stock = zdLT = 1.04(40) = 41.6 or 42 units R = Average demand during lead time + Safety stock R = 85 + 42 = 127 units Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 46 Reorder Point for Variable Demand and Variable Lead Time Often the case that both are variable The equations are more complicated Safety stock = zdLT R = (Average weekly demand Average lead time) + Safety stock = d L + Safety stock Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 47 Example 9.6 The Office Supply Shop estimates that the average demand for a popular ball-point pen is 12,000 pens per week with a standard deviation of 3,000 pens.

The current inventory policy calls for replenishment orders of 156,000 pens. The average lead time from the distributor is 5 weeks, with a standard deviation of 2 weeks. If management wants a 95 percent cycle-service level, what should the reorder point be? Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 48 y stock = zdLT Example 9.6 (5)(3,000)2 + (12,000)2(2)2 = 24,919.87 pens = (1.65)(24,919.87) = 41,117.79 or 41,118 pens (12,000)(5) + 41,118 = 101,118 pens Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 49 Application 9.4 Grey Wolf lodge is a popular 500-room hotel in the North Woods. Managers need to keep close tabs on all of the room service items, including a special pine-scented bar soap. The daily demand for the soap is 275 bars, with a standard deviation of 30 bars. Ordering cost is $10 and the inventory holding cost is $0.30/bar/year. The lead time from the supplier is 5 days, with a standard deviation of 1 day. The lodge is open 365 days a year. What should the reorder point be for the bar of soap if management wants to have a 99 percent cycle-service? Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 50 T Application 9.4

d = 275 bars L = 5 days d = LT = 30 bars 1 day 283.06 bars = (2.33)(283.06) = 659.53 or 660 bars = (275)(5) + 660 = 2,035 bars Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 51 Continuous Review Systems Two-Bin system Visual system An empty first bin signals the need to place an order Calculating total systems costs Total cost =

Annual cycle inventory holding cost + Annual ordering cost + Annual safety stock holding cost Q D C= (H) + (S) + (H) (Safety stock) Q 2 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 52 Application 9.5 The Discount Appliance Store uses a continuous review system (Q system). One of the companys items has the following characteristics:

Demand = 10 units/week (assume 52 weeks per year) Ordering or setup cost (S) = $45/order Holding cost (H) = $12/unit/year Lead time (L) = 3 weeks (constant) Standard deviation in weekly demand = 8 units Cycle-service level = 70% Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 53 Application 9.5 What is the EOQ for this item? D = 10/wk 52 wks/yr = 520 units EOQ = 2DS H =

2(520)(45) = 62 units 12 What is the desired safety stock? dLT = d L = 8 3 = 14 units Safety stock = zdLT = 0.525(14) = 8 units Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 54 Application 9.5 What is the desired reorder point R? R = Average demand during lead time + Safety stock 3(10) + 8 = 38 units R= What is the total annual cost? C= 62 520

($12) + ($45) + 8($12) = $845.42 2 62 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 55 Application 9.5 Suppose that the current policy is Q = 80 and R = 150. What will be the changes in average cycle inventory and safety stock if your EOQ and R values are implemented? Reducing Q from 80 to 62 Cycle inventory reduction = 40 31 = 9 units Safety stock reduction = 120 8 = 112 units Reducing R from 150 to 38 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 56 Periodic Review System (P)

Fixed interval reorder system or periodic reorder system Four of the original EOQ assumptions maintained No constraints are placed on lot size Holding and ordering costs Independent demand Lead times are certain Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 57 Periodic Review System (P) On-hand inventory T IP IP Order received

Q1 OH Order received IP Q3 Order received OH Q2 IP1 IP3 Order placed

Order placed IP2 L L P L Time P Protection interval Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 58 Example 9.7

A distribution center has a backorder for five 46-inch LCD TV sets. No inventory is currently on hand, and now is the time to review. How many should be reordered if T = 400 and no receipts are scheduled? IP = OH + SR BO = 0 + 0 5 = 5 sets T IP = 400 (5) = 405 sets That is, 405 sets must be ordered to bring the inventory position up to T sets. Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 59 Application 9.6 The on-hand inventory is 10 units, and T is 400. There are no back orders, but one scheduled receipt of 200 units. Now is the time to review. How much should be reordered? IP = OH + SR BO = 10 + 200 0 = 210 T IP = 400 210 = 190

The decision is to order 190 units Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 60 Periodic Review System Selecting the time between reviews, choosing P and T Selecting T when demand is variable and lead time is constant IP covers demand over a protection interval of P + L The average demand during the protection interval is d(P + L), or T = d (P + L) + safety stock for protection interval Safety stock = zP + L , where P + L = d P L Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 61 Example 9.8 Again, let us return to the bird feeder example. Recall that demand for the bird feeder is normally

distributed with a mean of 18 units per week and a standard deviation in weekly demand of 5 units. The lead time is 2 weeks, and the business operates 52 weeks per year. The Q system called for an EOQ of 75 units and a safety stock of 9 units for a cycleservice level of 90 percent. What is the equivalent P system? Answers are to be rounded to the nearest integer. Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 62 Example 9.8 We first define D and then P. Here, P is the time between reviews, expressed in weeks because the data are expressed as demand per week: D = (18 units/week)(52 weeks/year) = 936 units EOQ 75 (52) = 4.2 or 4 weeks P = D (52) = 936 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 63 Example 9.8 We now find the standard deviation of demand over the protection interval (P + L) = 6: P+L =d P+L =5 6 =12.25 units For a 90 percent cycle-service level z = 1.28: Safety stock = zP + L = 1.28(12.25) = 15.68 or 16 units We now solve for T: T = Average demand during the protection interval + Safety stock = d(P + L) + safety stock = (18 units/week)(6 weeks) + 16 units = 124 units Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 64 Periodic Review System

Use simulation when both demand and lead time are variable Suitable to single-bin systems Total costs for the P system are the sum of the same three cost elements as in the Q system Order quantity and safety stock are calculated differently dP D C= (H) + (S) + HzP + L 2 dP Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 65 Application 9.7 Return to Discount Appliance Store (Application 9.5), but now use the P system for the item.

Previous information: Demand = 10 units/wk (assume 52 weeks per year) = 520 EOQ = 62 units (with reorder point system) Lead time (L) = 3 weeks Standard deviation in weekly demand = 8 units z = 0.525 (for cycle-service level of 70%) Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 66 Application 9.7 Reorder interval P, if you make the average lot size using the Periodic Review System approximate the EOQ. P = (EOQ/D)(52) = (62/520)(52) = 6.2 or 6 weeks Safety stock Safety stock = d P+L 8 6 3 12.6 or 13units 0.525 Target inventory

T = d(P + L) + safety stock for protection interval T = 10(6 + 3) + 13 = 103 units Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 67 Application 9.7 Total cost C= = (H) + (S) + HzP + L 10(6) 520 ($12) + ($45) + (13)($12) = $906.00 10(6) 2 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 68 Comparative Advantages Primary advantages of P systems Convenient Orders can be combined Only need to know IP when review is made Primary advantages of Q systems Review frequency may be individualized Fixed lot sizes can result in quantity discounts Lower safety stocks Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 69 Hybrid systems Optional replenishment systems Optimal review, min-max, or (s,S) system, like the P system Reviews IP at fixed time intervals and places a variablesized order to cover expected needs Ensures that a reasonable large order is placed

Base-stock system Replenishment order is issued each time a withdrawal is made Order quantities vary to keep the inventory position at R Minimizes cycle inventory, but increases ordering costs Appropriate for expensive items Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 70 Solved Problem 1 A distribution center experiences an average weekly demand of 50 units for one of its items. The product is valued at $650 per unit. Average inbound shipments from the factory warehouse average 350 units. Average lead time (including ordering delays and transit time) is 2 weeks. The distribution center operates 52 weeks per year; it carries a 1-week supply of inventory as safety stock and no anticipation inventory. What is the value of the average aggregate inventory

being held by the distribution center? Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 71 Solved Problem 1 Type of Inventory Cycle Safety stock Anticipation Pipeline Calculation of Average Inventory Q 2 = 350 = 175 units 2 1-week supply = 50 units None

dL = (50 units/week)(2 weeks) = 100 units Average aggregate inventory = 325 units Value of aggregate inventory = $650(325) = $211,250 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 72 Solved Problem 2 Bookers Book Bindery divides SKUs into three classes, according to their dollar usage. Calculate the usage values of the following SKUs and determine which is most likely to be classified as class A. SKU Number Description 1 Boxes 2

Quantity Used per Year Unit Value ($) 500 3.00 Cardboard (square feet) 18,000 0.02 3 Cover stock 10,000

0.75 4 Glue (gallons) 75 40.00 5 Inside covers 20,000 0.05 6 Reinforcing tape (meters)

3,000 0.15 7 Signatures 150,000 0.45 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 73 Solved Problem 2 SKU Number Description Quantity

Used per Year Unit Value ($) Annual Dollar Usage ($) 500 3.00 = 1,500 Cardboard (square feet) 18,000

0.02 = 360 3 Cover stock 10,000 0.75 = 7,500

4 Glue (gallons) 75 40.00 = 3,000 5 Inside covers 20,000 0.05

= 1,000 6 Reinforcing tape (meters) 3,000 0.15 = 450 7 Signatures

150,000 0.45 = 67,500 Total 81,310 1 Boxes 2 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 74 Solved Problem 2 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 75 Solved Problem 2 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 76 Solved Problem 3 Nelsons Hardware Store stocks a 19.2 volt cordless drill that is a popular seller. Annual demand is 5,000 units, the ordering cost is $15, and the inventory holding cost is $4/unit/year. a. What is the economic order quantity? b. What is the total annual cost for this inventory item? a. The order quantity is EOQ =

2DS H = = 2(5,000)($15) $4 37,500 = 193.65 or 194 drills b. The total annual cost is Q D C = 2 (H) + Q (S) = 5,000 194 ($4) + ($15) = $774.60 194 2 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 77 Solved Problem 4 A regional distributor purchases discontinued appliances from various suppliers and then sells them on demand to retailers in the region. The distributor operates 5 days per week, 52 weeks per year. Only when it is open for business can orders be received. Management wants to reevaluate its current inventory policy, which calls for order quantities of 440 counter-top mixers. The following data are estimated for the mixer: Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 78 Solved Problem 4 a. What order quantity Q, and reorder point, R, should be used? b.

What is the total annual cost of the system? c. If on-hand inventory is 40 units, one open order for 440 mixers is pending, and no backorders exist, should a new order be placed? Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 79 Solved Problem 4 a. Annual demand is D = (5 days/week)(52 weeks/year)(100 mixers/day) = 26,000 mixers/year The order quantity is EOQ = 2DS = H =

2(26,000)($35) $9.40 193,167 = 440.02 or 440 mixers Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 80 Solved Problem 4 The standard deviation of the demand during lead time distribution is dLT = d L = 30 3 = 51.96 A 92 percent cycle-service level corresponds to z = 1.41 Safety stock = zdLT = 1.41(51.96 mixers) = 73.26 or 73 mixers 100(3) = 300 mixers Reorder point (R) = Average demand during lead time + Safety stock = 300 mixers + 73 mixers = 373 mixers With a continuous review system, Q = 440 and R = 373 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 81

Solved Problem 4 b. The total annual cost for the Q systems is Q D C = 2 (H) + Q (S) + (H)(Safety stock) 26,000 440 C= ($9.40) + ($35) + ($9.40)(73) = $4,822.38 440 2 c. Inventory position = On-hand inventory + Scheduled receipts Backorders IP = OH + SR BO = 40 + 440 0 = 480 mixers Because IP (480) exceeds R (373), do not place a new order

Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 82 Solved Problem 5 Suppose that a periodic review (P) system is used at the distributor in Solved Problem 4, but otherwise the data are the same. a. Calculate the P (in workdays, rounded to the nearest day) that gives approximately the same number of orders per year as the EOQ. b. What is the target inventory level, T? Compare the P system to the Q system in Solved Problem 4. c. What is the total annual cost of the P system? d. It is time to review the item. On-hand inventory is 40 mixers; receipt of 440 mixers is scheduled, and no backorders exist. How much should be reordered? Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 83 Solved Problem 5 a. The time between orders is

P= EOQ D (260 days/year) = 440 (260) = 4.4 or 4 days 26,000 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 84 Solved Problem 5 b. The OM Solver data below shows that T = 812 and safety stock = (1.41)(79.37) = 111.91 or about 112 mixers. The corresponding Q system for the counter-top mixer requires less safety stock. Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 85 Solved Problem 5 c. The total annual cost of the P system is C= (H) + (S) + (H)(Safety stock) 100(4) 26,000 C= ($9.40) + 100(4) ($35) + ($9.40)(1.41)(79.37) 2 = $5,207.80 d. Inventory position is the amount on hand plus scheduled receipts minus backorders, or IP = OH + SR BO =

40 + 440 0 = 480 mixers The order quantity is the target inventory level minus the inventory position, or Q = T IP = 812 mixers 480 mixers = 332 mixers An order for 332 mixers should be placed. Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 86 Solved Problem 6 Grey Wolf Lodge is a popular 500-room hotel in the North Woods. Managers need to keep close tabs on all room service items, including a special pine-scented bar soap. The daily demand for the soap is 275 bars, with a standard deviation of 30 bars. Ordering cost is $10 and the inventory holding cost is $0.30/bar/year. The lead time from the supplier is 5 days, with a standard deviation of 1 day. The lodge is open 365 days a year. a. What is the economic order quantity for the bar of soap? b. What should the reorder point be for the bar of soap if management wants to have a 99 percent cycle-service level?

c. What is the total annual cost for the bar of soap, assuming a Q system will be used? Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 87 Solved Problem 6 a. We have D = (275)(365) = 100,375 bars of soap; S = $10; and H = $0.30. The EOQ for the bar of soap is EOQ = 2DS H = = 2(100,375)($10) $0.30 6,691,666.7 = 2,586.83 or 2,587 bars Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 88 Solved Problem 6 dLT = stock L + d 2 d 2 2 LT = (5)(30)2 + (275)2(1)2 = 283.06 bars Safety stock = zdLT = (2.33)(283.06) = 659.53 or 660 bars

= (275)(5) + 660 = 2,035 bars Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09- 89 Solved Problem 6 c. The total annual cost for the Q system is Q D C= (H) + (S) + (H)(Safety stock) Q 2 2,587 100,375 C= ($0.30) + ($10) + ($0.30)(660) = $974.05 2 2,587 Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

09- 90 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Printed in the United States of America. Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 09 - 91

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    3 different recipe formats. Standard: ingredients listed first, then instructions follow.. Action: pictures to refer to throughout the recipe. Narrative: recipe in paragraph form with no organization.
  • Kristen Matha and Leeland Zeller NCAA 2015 Regional

    Kristen Matha and Leeland Zeller NCAA 2015 Regional

    Your head women's lacrosse coach wants to work at a noninstitutional camp and film the participation of two recruits. Is this permissible? Analysis: No, coaches may not be involved in recruiting while employed at noninstitutional camp/clinic. May record if not...
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    Ultrasound PCS 335

    Equation Doppler Relationships Continuous Wave Doppler Continuous Wave Doppler Continuous Wave Doppler: Receiver Function Pulse Wave vs. Continuous Wave Doppler Doppler Pulses Color-Flow Display Features Duplex Doppler Gates Spectral Display Spectral Broadening Pulse Wave Doppler Spectral vs. Color-Flow Power Doppler
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    Understanding Observational Studies

    Understanding Observational Studies Lecture 9 Section 3.4 Fri, Feb 3, 2006 Types of Observational Studies Retrospective study - The subjects are grouped by the response variable. Then the explanatory variable is measured for each group and compared. Prospective study -...
  • Plant Structure And Growth - Mt. San Antonio College

    Plant Structure And Growth - Mt. San Antonio College

    Control Systems in Plants Plant Hormones Coordinates growth Coordinates development Coordinates responses to environmental stimuli Plant Hormones Auxin (IAA) Cytokinins Gibberllins Abscisic Acid Ethylene Oligogaccharins Brassinosteroids Auxins Stimulates stem elongation Stimulates root growth Stimulates differentiation and branching Stimulates development of...
  • Vocabulary Week 5 - PC\|MAC

    Vocabulary Week 5 - PC\|MAC

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  • DB-2 - download.psdn.com

    DB-2 - download.psdn.com

    This slide transitions back to the "tuning your statements" sub-topic! This example is overly simplistic but it makes the point!! Example also shows how can specify constant for non-leading index component to get first row only in joining data. This...
  • Vocabulary Words of the Week - Weebly

    Vocabulary Words of the Week - Weebly

    - noun-inequality, the condition or fact of being unequal in age, rank, or degree ... aesthetic-adj.-relating or pertaining to a sense of beauty or art. aloof-adj.-apart, indifferent, detached. ... Vocabulary Words of the Week