Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Mary Ellen

Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Mary Ellen

Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 1 2015Cengage CengageLearning. Learning.All AllRights RightsReserved. Reserved.May Maynot notbe bescanned, scanned,copied

copiedororduplicated, duplicated,ororposted postedtotoaapublicly publiclyaccessible accessiblewebsite, website,ininwhole wholeororininpart. part. 2015 Chapter 12 Informal Business Reports Collecting information is nearly effortless today. Making sense of massive amounts of data is a lot harder.

Unprocessed data become meaningful through skillful sorting, analysis, combination, and recombination. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 2 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Interpreting Digital-Age Data Table systematic columns and rows The mean (arithmetic average), median (middle point in a range of values), and mode (most frequent value)

Correlation relationships between variables Grid boxes of rows and columns to sort data Decision matrix grid that allows comparison among weighted criteria Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 3 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Tabulating and Analyzing Data When researchers tabulate and analyze data, relationships among two or more variables may emerge that help explain the findings.

Proceed with caution: Are the variables truly related? Does a causal relationship exist? Apparent correlations can stimulate investigation and present possible solutions. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 4 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Coincidences or Correlation? 1. Interpret and summarize the findings.

2. Relate the conclusions to the report problem. Focus only on conclusions that help solve the original problem. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 5 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Drawing Report Conclusions 3. Limit the conclusions to the data presented. Do not introduce new material. 4. Be objective. Avoid

exaggerating or manipulating the data to prove a point. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 6 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Drawing Report Conclusions 5. Use consistent criteria. In evaluating options, use the same criteria for each alternative. 6. Enumerate each conclusion. Number and list each item.

Present each conclusion in parallel form. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 7 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Drawing Report Conclusions 1. Suggest actions. What specific procedures can help solve the report problem? 2. Focus on recommendations that are practical and agreeable. Suggest feasible actions that would be acceptable to this audience.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 8 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Making Report Recommendations 3. Present recommendations separately. Enumerate each in a statement beginning with a verb. For example: Invest half of the income in growth funds. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e

Ch. 12, Slide 9 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Making Report Recommendations 4. Describe how to implement the recommendations, if requested. Some writers present detailed plans for executing the recommendation. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 10

2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Making Report Recommendations Conclusions: The raw materials used in smartphones often come from war-torn countries and are extracted under dangerous conditions, often by children. Recommendation: Create a fair-trade smartphone that is not manufactured from polluting conflict metals mined by children. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e

Ch. 12, Slide 11 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Report Conclusions and Recommendations Time: Arrange data by chronology, e.g. 2014, 2015, 2016. Component: Arrange data by classifications such as location, geography, division, product, or part. A report discussing company profits could be organized by product or division. Importance: Order data from most important to least important or vice versa.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 12 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Organizing Report Information Criteria: Arrange data by evaluating categories. In a report comparing tablet computers, organize by price, warranty, size, screen resolution, and more. Convention: Organize data according to prescribed categories. Proposals, for example, are organized by staff, budget, schedule, and so forth.

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 13 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Organizing Report Information Introductions Discuss purpose and significance of report. Preview main points and order of development.

Transitions however on the contrary therefore moreover Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 14 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Structural Cues for Reports Headings Write short but clear headings. Experiment with wording that

tells who, what, when, where, and why. Include at least one heading per report page. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 15 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Structural Cues for Reports Functional Headings Executive Summary Introduction Findings Discussion

Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 16 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Types of Headings Talking Headings The Best Business Laptop Money Can Buy Tablet Computers Displace Notebooks Texting: The New Smoking Gun Whats New in Social Media? Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e

Ch. 12, Slide 17 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Types of Headings Combination Headings Background: How Apple Won Personnel: The Savvy Workforce Production Costs: The Investment is Paying Off Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 18 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Types of Headings Introduction Identify the report and its purpose. Present a brief overview of the reports organization, especially for longer reports. Provide brief background information when readers are unfamiliar with the topic. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 19 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Informational Report Content Report Body Group facts or findings into three to five roughly equal, discrete segments. Organize by time, component, importance, criteria, convention, or some other method. Supply functional or talking heads (at least one per page) to describe each section. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 20

2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Informational Report Content Report Body Use an informal, conversational writing style unless the audience expects a formal tone. Use bullets, numbered and lettered lists, headings, underlined items, and white space to enhance readability. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 21 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Informational Report Content Summary/ Conclusion When necessary, briefly review the main points and discuss what action will follow. If relevant, express appreciation or describe your willingness to provide further information. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 22 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Informational Report Content Periodic (activity) reports Trip, convention, conference reports Progress and interim reports Investigative reports Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 23 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Typical Informational Reports Introduction

Explain why the report was written. For research studies, include the significance, scope, limitations, and methodology of the investigation. Preview the reports organization. Summarize the conclusions and recommendations for receptive audiences. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 24 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Analytical Report Contents Report Body

Discuss the pros and cons of each alternative. Establish criteria to evaluate alternatives. In yardstick studies, create criteria to use in measuring each alternative consistently. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 25 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Analytical Report Contents Report Body Support the findings with

evidence: facts, statistics, expert opinion, survey data, and other proof. Use headings, enumerations, lists, tables, and graphics to focus emphasis. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 26 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Analytical Report Contents Conclusions/Recommendations Develop reasonable conclusions

that answer the research question. Justify the conclusions with highlights from the findings. Make recommendations, if asked. Explain recommendations that need explaining. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 27 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Analytical Report Contents Justification/recommendation reports Make recommendations to

management; provide data to solve problems and make decisions. Feasibility reports Analyze problems and predict whether alternatives will be practical or advisable. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 28 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Typical Short Analytical Reports

Yardstick reports Establish criteria and evaluate alternatives by measuring against the yardstick criteria. Mary Ellen Guffey & Dana Loewy, Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Ch. 12, Slide 29 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Typical Short Analytical Reports

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