The Foundation for Success in Secondary Grades Grades

The Foundation for Success in Secondary Grades Grades

The Foundation for Success in Secondary Grades Grades 912 ELA I Day 1 We know from experience the hard work teachers face every day as they strive to help their students meet the challenges set by higher standards. We are dedicated to empowering teachers by providing free, high-quality standards-aligned resources for the classroom, the opportunity for immersive training through our Institute, and the option of support through our website offerings. We are a team of current and former classroom teachers, curriculum writers, school leaders and education experts who have worked in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. 2 About Me Picture Picture of

of you you Information Information about about YOU YOU Raise Raise your your hand hand if if you you are are an an ELA ELA teacher teacher

you you are are an an ELA ELA teacher teacher coach coach you you hold hold aa different different role role you you teach teach in in aa district district school school you you teach

teach in in aa charter charter school school you you teach teach or or work work in in aa different different type type of of school school or or organization organization 3

We Take Data Seriously 3-minute online Daily Survey. Facilitators will address feedback the following day. Thursday 10minute online Knowledge Survey Post-Test. Answer key will be available. 4 Framing the Week SHIFTS DAY 1: Framing a Comprehensive ELA Program: Standards, Shifts, and Text Complexity DAY 2: Fluency and Complex Text DAY 3: Developing a Sequence of TDQs Days 4 & 5: Building Knowledge and Proficiency through Teaching Argumentation STANDARDS

5 Session Objectives and Agenda Day 1 Participants will be able to: Describe educational equity of instruction. Recognize that the shifts change the focus of teaching with the standards Analyze how the standards create a trajectory Recognize the importance of academic vocabulary in instruction Recognize the components of text complexity Identify instruction that incorporates the first two shifts and standards O O

6 Opening and Community Builder Norms that Support Our Learning Take responsibility for yourself as a learner Honor timeframes (start, end, activity) Be an active and hands-on learner Use technology to enhance learning Strive for equity of voice Contribute to a learning environment in which it is safe to not know 7 Where You Might Be During the Week Inspired by Jennifer Abrams Moments of Validation Moments of Reminding

Moments of New Information Notice where you are at any given time and support yourself and others by: Asking Questions Taking Notes Stretching Yourself 8 Our Approach At UnboundEd, we ground our learning in the intersection of the standards, content, aligned curriculum and the equitable instructional practices that are essential for closing the opportunity gap caused by systemic racism and bias. 9

We are Equity Literate when we have the Ability to recognize biases and inequities, including those that are subtle first in ourselves [and then in the systems we serve] Ability to respond to biases, discrimination and inequities in a thoughtful and equitable manner Ability to redress biases, discrimination and inequalities not only by responding to interpersonal bias, but also studying the ways in which bigger social change happens Ability to cultivate and sustain bias-free, discrimination-free communities [in doing so creating equitable environments],which requires an understanding that doing so is a basic responsibility for everyone in a civil society Defining Equity Equity is engaging in practices that meet students where they are and advances their learning by giving them what they need. Its about fairness, not sameness. Equity ensures that all children regardless of circumstances are receiving high-quality and Standards-aligned instruction with access

to high-quality materials and resources. We want to ensure that Standards-aligned instruction is a pathway to the equitable practices needed to close the gaps caused by systemic and systematic racism, bias, and poverty. All week, we will explore our learning through an equity lens, and we will capture those moments visibly here in our room. 11 What makes something equitable or inequitable? What inequities exist? What individual responsibilities do we have to address them? Our Conversations Invent Us 1. Through our speech and our silence, we become our smaller or larger selves. 2. Through our speech and our silence, we diminish or enhance the other person, and we narrow or expand the possibilities between us. 3. How we use our voice determines the quality of our

relationships, who we are in the world, and what the world can be and might become. 4. Clearly, a lot is at stake here. Harriet Lerner, The Dance of Connection 13 Equity Envision It So You Can See It For all educators, it is important to have a clear vision of what educationally equitable environments. Gorksi and Salwell provide 5 Principles to guide you. 4 min jot down concrete examples of what an equitable education environment would look like, sound like, and feel like to students, families, and staff. 6 min share in pairs at your tables, looking for commonalities and new ideas to expand your thinking 5 min whole group sharing of ideas you heard that will help all of us Looks Like Sounds Like

Feels Like O O 14 Myth Busting Higher standards do NOT mean we are no longer teaching our students to LOVE reading. Development of the LOVE of reading which is so clearly learned and inspired by elementary teachers is absolutely critical. Perhaps more important than it ever was. BUT No one can learn to LOVE reading without first learning how to read. AND Historically, we havent always done a great job of teaching students how to read. 15 What does it mean to be College and

Career Ready? The level of preparation students need in order to be ready to enroll and succeed without remediation in credit-bearing entrylevel coursework at a two- or four-year institution, trade school, or technical school. Reading Between the Lines: What the ACT Reveals About College Readiness in Reading ACT (2006) 16 Performance on ACT by Comprehension 17 17 Performance on ACT by Textual Element 18

18 Average Percentage of Questions Correct Performance on the ACT Reading Test by Degree of Text Complexity ACT Reading Benchmark ACT Reading Test Score 19 Average Percentage of Questions Correct Performance on the ACT Reading Test by Degree of Text Complexity ACT Reading Benchmark

ACT Reading Test Score 20 Average Percentage of Questions Correct Performance on the ACT Reading Test by Degree of Text Complexity ACT Reading Benchmark ACT Reading Test Score 21 1992 64% 2015

of U.S. fourthgraders fail to meet the proficient benchmark. 22 Career and Literacy Take the next five minutes to: Independently read and answer the questions on the Literacy handout With an elbow partner, identify the skills required to answer each of the questions. O O 23 The Standards and Shifts What do we do

with those complex texts? HIGHER STANDARDS Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently (at grade level). 24 Using the App in ELA IF YOUR STATE HAS A DIFFERENT APP CommonCore POWERED BY

MasteryConnect 25 Lets Take a Look Reading Standard 1 toto determine what thethe texttext sayssays Read Readclosely closely determine what explicitly toto make logical

inferences fromfrom it; cite explicitlyand and make logical inferences it; specific textualtextual evidence when writing speaking cite specific evidence when or writing or tospeaking

support conclusions drawn from the text.from to support conclusions drawn the text. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters O O uncertain. 26 A Progression of Skill Building: Collaborative Practice For your groups standard from Grades 9-12

How do the outcomes remain the same? How do the outcomes change? What students must be able to or know do in order to meet the demands of this standard? 27 Please locate the following in the Reading Standards Define Literary Terms: onomatopoeia, alliteration, assonance, character traits, foreshadowing, pathos, personification, simile Define Plot: rising action, exposition, climax, resolution, plot diagrams Vocabulary Lists Connections: text to self, text to nature, text to world, text to text Kinds of conflict: person v person, person v nature, person v self 28

In Service to the Standards Grade 9-10 standard 4 Grade 11-12 Standard 4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone) Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other

authors.) What imagery in the opening situation helps to establish the exposition of the story?How does the connotation of these words help to develop the tone? What is the pack doing to the bunks? How do you know? What is this a remedy for? What does the authors use of exuberant suggest about these streams and the girls? Rereading the lines, We remedied this to kinetic laughter, what kind of feeling is the author trying to create? (What tone does the author establish?) Kinetic means : characterized by movement. 29 Whats the Difference In Rigor? Draw Draw aa plot plot diagram diagram for for St. St. Lucys Lucys

Home Home for for Girls Girls Raised Raised by by Wolves Wolves by by Karen Karen Russell, Russell, identifying identifying the the exposition, exposition, rising rising action, action, climax, climax, falling falling action,

action, and and resolution. resolution. State State the the theme. theme. What What are are Claudette Claudette and and Jeanettes Jeanettes character character traits? traits? What What key key episode

episode in in Phase Phase 3 3 of of St. St. Lucys Lucys Home Home for for Girls Girls Raised Raised by by Wolves Wolves by by Karen Karen Russell Russell gives gives us us

new new information information about about Claudette Claudette and and Jeanettes Jeanettes character? character? What What theme theme may may be be emerging emerging from from the the characters characters interaction interaction in

in this this section section of of the the text? text? What What language language does does the the author author use use to to show show us, us, instead instead of of tell

tell us, us, this this change? change? What What conflict conflict does does each each character character struggle struggle with with in in phase phase three? three? 30 Morning Take-Aways

31 Lunch LUNCH 32 Post-Lunch Energizer At your table: What are your favorite book, fiction or nonfiction? What is most impactful: the meaning, language, structure, or information in it? 33 33

Revisiting Agenda and Objectives OBJECTIVES Describe educational equity of instruction. Recognize that the shifts change the focus of teaching with the standards Analyze how the standards create a trajectory Recognize the importance of academic vocabulary in instruction Recognize the components of text complexity Identify instruction that incorporates the first two shifts AGENDA I. A Focus on Equity II. The Standards Trajectory III. Advancing Our Students Language

and literacy IV. Lunch V. Shift 1 and Complex Text VI. Shift 2 and Evidence VII. Classroom Observation VIII. Summary and Reflection 34 The Shifts 1. Regular practice with complex text and its academic language 2. Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational 3. Intentionally building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction 35

35 Shift 1: Regular Practice with Complex Text and its Academic Language Read the first three pages (p. 3-5) independently and consider the following: What is Marilyn Adams main claim in this section of the article? What evidence does she use to support her claim? online O O 36 Text Complexity

Levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands Readability measures and other scores of text complexity Reader variables (such as motivation, knowledge, and experiences) and task variables (such as purpose and the complexity generated by the task assigned and the questions posed) 37 Qualitative Dimensions of Complexity Appendix A, Page 6 Levels of Meaning Structure

Language Conventionality and Clarity Knowledge Demands: 1. Life Experiences 2. Cultural/Literary Knowledge 3. Content/Discipline Knowledge 38 Qualitative Features of Complex Text Subtle and/or frequent transitions Multiple and/or subtle themes and purposes Density of information Unfamiliar settings, topics, or events Lack of repetition, overlap, or similarity in words and sentences Complex sentences Uncommon vocabulary Lack of words, sentences, or paragraphs that review or pull things together for the student Longer paragraphs

Any text structure that is less narrative and/or mixes structures Qualitative Measures Literature Text Complexity and Information Text Complexity Rubrics and Tool Meaning Structure Knowledge Demands Language 40 Quantitative Measures Word Difficulty (Frequency and Length)

Sentence Length Other Features of Words Sentence Syntax Text Cohesion 41 Reader Task Considerations How does this get weighted with regard to text selection for class instruction? What does this mean for students independent reading? 42 abstract agent

embedded adverbial em passive voice nominalized form of verb characterize relative clause Academic Language and Vocabulary With table partners discuss: How often do you pre-read class texts with tier 2, or academic vocabulary, in mind?

How much time in class do you intentionally carve out to address academic vocabulary? 44 Lets Learn a New Word Excrescence noun excrescence \ik-skre-sn(t)s, ek-\ a projection or outgrowth especially when abnormal Excrescence 45

What We Know Most vocabulary is learned implicitly. Word learning is most efficient when the reader (listener) already understands the context well. Tiny gains on a dozen words is more efficient than large gains on just one word at a time. What makes vocabulary valuable and important is not the words themselves so much as the understandings they afford.

46 Shift 2: Reading, Writing and Speaking Grounded in Evidence from Text, Both Literary and Informational Which of the following questions most strongly reflects Shift 2? A. Using evidence from the text, Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational by Marilyn Jager Adams, what happened with the SATs in 1977? B. How do the findings from the College Board support Marilyn Jager Adams conclusion ...a great benefit of the common core curriculum is that it would drive a thorough overhaul of the texts we give students to read, and the kinds of learning and thought we expect our reading to support? 47 Executing Shifts Through the Standards CCRA.2: Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize key supporting details and ideas.

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL DEMANDS Understanding of: Meaning of vocabulary That its possible to have more than one central idea in a text Meaning of analyze What it means for a theme to develop How to summarize How to pick out a relevant detail or supporting idea GOING DEEPER What analysis looks like: Linking relevant supporting details back to a central idea Picking evidence and explaining how that supports ones point Tracing the development of a theme and being able to articulate

it 48 Reading Targets Traditional goal: Students leave the lesson knowing the details of the narrative. State standards goal: students leave the lesson having read, analyzed, and understood what they have READ. 49 Practice: Assessing Text Complexity The Hunger Games Sixty

Sixty seconds. seconds. That's That's how how long long we're we're required required to to stand stand on on our our metal metal circles circles before before the the sound sound of of aa gong gong

releases releases us. us. Step Step off off before before the the minute minute is is up, up, and and landmines landmines blow blow your your legs legs off. off. Sixty Sixty seconds seconds to

to take take in in the the ring ring of of tributes tributes all all equidistant equidistant from from the the Cornucopia, Cornucopia, aa giant giant golden golden horn horn shaped shaped like like aa cone

cone with with aa curved curved tail, tail, the the mouth mouth of of which which is is at at least least seven seven metres metres high, high, spilling spilling over over with with the the things

things that that will will give give us us life life here here in in the the arena. arena. The Lottery The The villagers villagers kept kept their their distance, distance, leaving

leaving a a space space between between themselves themselves and and the the stool. stool. and and when when Mr. Mr. Summers Summers said, said, "Some "Some of of you you fellows fellows want

want to to give give me me a a hand?" hand?" there there was was a a hesitation hesitation before before two two men men Mr. Mr. Martin Martin and and his his oldest oldest son,

son, Baxter Baxter came came forward forward to to hold hold the the box box steady steady on on the the stool stool while while Mr. Mr. Summers Summers stirred stirred up up the

the papers papers inside inside it. it. Separate O O handout Break 15 minutes 1 51 Knowing What You Are Seeing 52 Knowing What You Are Seeing

A. What standards are at center of this lesson? B. Is a majority of the lesson spent listening, reading, writing, or speaking about text(s)? Identify evidence. C. Are the text(s) above the complexity level expected for the grade and time in the school year? D. Do the text(s) exhibit exceptional craft and thought and/or provide useful information? Where appropriate, are the texts richly illustrated? E. Do the questions and tasks address the text by attending to its particular structure, concepts, ideas, events, and details? Provide evidence. 53 Whip Around Your Table 1. Select a time keeper. 2. Beginning with question 1, each person has 15 seconds to share their findings with no feedback, and this moves around the table. 3. Repeat process with questions 2-5

54 Write First: Focus on Equity Equity is engaging in practices that meet students where they are and advances their learning by giving them what they need. Its about fairness, not sameness. Equity ensures that all children regardless of circumstances are receiving high-quality and Standards-aligned instruction with access to high-quality materials and resources. We want to ensure that Standards-aligned instruction is a pathway to the equitable practices needed to close the gaps caused by systemic and systematic racism, bias, and poverty. Stronger Every Turn Each time you talk to a partner, you build from and borrow the ideas and language of previous partners. Try to make your answer stronger each time with better and better evidence, examples, and explanations. 6 minutes Bring your notes.

Form triads with people you have not yet spent time with. Share and discuss your written reflection with your partners. Jot down ideas that they share that improve your own discussion or you think are important that you did not consider 6 minutes Find a new triad with two new partners. Repeat the process, incorporating your previous partners feedback into the conversation where appropriate 2 minutes Revise your notes or reconsider your positions based on the conversations. Be prepared to share out. 56 Revisiting Equity Envision It So You Can See It For all educators, it is important to have a clear vision of what educationally equitable environments. Gorksi and Salwell provide 5 Principles to guide you.

Looks Like Sounds Like Feels Like O O Closing - Revisit Objectives Are we better prepared to: describe educational equity of instruction? describe how the shifts change the focus of teaching with the standards? explain how the standards create a trajectory of learning? explain the importance of academic language? explain the components of text complexity? identify instruction that incorporates complex text and its academic language? identify instruction where reading, writing, and speaking are

grounded in evidence from text? 58 References 10 Harriet Lerner, The Dance Connection 11,12 http://www.edchange.org/publications/Equity-Literacy-for-All.pdf 14-18 Reading: Inbetween the Lines http://www.act.org/content/dam/act/unsecured/documents/reading_summary.pdf 19 http://www.nationsreportcard.gov/reading_math_2015/#reading?grade=4 http://www.nationsreportcard.gov/reading_math_2015/#reading?grade=48

http://www.nationsreportcard.gov/reading_math_2015/#reading?grade=12 22, 23, 24, 25, 35, 39 http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/ 26 https://www.engageny.org/sites/default/files/resource/attachments/ela-9.1.1.pdf 33 http://www.aft.org/sites/default/files/periodicals/Adams.pdf 36, 37, 38 http://achievethecore.org/content/upload/nelson_perfetti_liben_measures_of_text_difficulty_research_ela.pdf 40

http://languagemagazine.com/?page_id=6826 41, 45 CCSS Appendix A:http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_A.pdf 23 47 Jackson, Shirley. The Lottery. The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, 1991. 291-302. Collins, Suzanne. The Hunger Games. New York: Scholastic Press, 2008. 49, 51, 53 https://www.achieve.org/files/EQuIP-ELArubric-06-24-13-FINAL.pdf 50 https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/analyze-text-with-storyboards

52 http://commoncore.americaachieves.org/samplevideo/4f88b96526b6154034000001 60

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