GCSE Resistant Materials Topic Design Process Tools and

GCSE Resistant Materials Topic Design Process Tools and Processes CAD/CAM Quality Revision Additional Notes book Understand Design Brief to develop and use design briefs and specifications for product development How to analyse products Design specification (ACCESS FM) analyse and evaluate existing products, including those from professional designers; Designing ideas Development of ideas be creative and innovative when designing; design products to meet the needs of clients and consumers; consider environmental and sustainability issues in designing products; Planning to manufacture Have a knowledge and understanding of hand and power tools Pg2 Pg4 Pg6 Pg8-14 Pg16 Pg18-20 Have a knowledge and understanding of how to Pg22-24 forming, bending, casting and moulding techniques. Casting and Moulding Candidates should be familiar with and able to use a range of tools and equipment that are used for casting and moulding commonly used materials. How to assemble and finish products Pg26 Screws, bolts, nails, joints, joining metals Pg28-32

To show an understanding of the Pg34 advantages/disadvantages of CAD/CAM and be aware of specific programmes/machines use tools and equipment safely with regard to themselves and others; work accurately and efficiently in terms of time, materials/ingredients and components; manufacture products applying quality control procedures; have knowledge of Computer-Aided Manufacture (CAM) and to use as appropriate Quality assurance pg36 Need to show an understanding of how products are manufactured to meet quality control measures understand the need to protect design ideas GCSE Resistant Materials Topic Materials and components Systems Quality Revision Additional Notes book Properties of materials, wood, manufactured Pg 38-46 boards, metal and plastics investigate and select appropriate materials and components; recognise the working characteristics of the common forms of wood; know the difference between hardwoods and softwoods, and between natural timber and manufactured boards. recognise the working characteristics of the common forms of metals; understand the differences between ferrous and non-ferrous metals and how they are used; know that the properties of metals can be changed by heat treatments; know that metals can be combined to form alloys; recognise the working characteristics of common forms of plastics; understand the difference between thermoplastics and thermosetting plastics and how this affects the way they are used; know that smart materials have a reactive

capacity; know that different materials can be combined to change their characteristics; Composite, new materials and smart materials Pg 48 be aware of the source of a range of materials, understand they are processed for use, and how they can be reused, recycled or disposed of, and the environmental consequences of their use; Fixtures and fittings, including adhesives Pg50-52 Electrical systems Pg64-56 Mechanical systems Quality control systems Candidates should: understand and incorporate quality checks during the making of a product; implement quality control procedures using devices to ensure the consistent production of products. GCSE Resistant Materials Topic Safety and the Environment Industrial Awareness Revision Additional Notes book Social, moral and environmental issues consider the conflicting demands that moral, cultural, economic, and social values and needs can make in the planning and in the designing of products; consider environmental and sustainability issues in designing products; be aware of the source of a range of materials, understand they are processed for use, and how they can be reused, recycled or disposed of, and the environmental consequences of their use;

Health and Safety consider health and safety in all its aspects; Scale of production Manufacturing Systems Candidates should understand how products are produced for various markets and the types of production systems used, including one-off, batch and continuous production. devise and apply test procedures to check the quality of their work at critical/key points during development, and to indicate ways of modifying and improving it when necessary Industrial systems for batch or volume production Candidates should understand the commercial implications of manufacturing in quantity and the effects of introducing new technologies. Pg62 Pg64 Pg66 GCSE Resistant Materials Topic Materials Components Adhesives and Applied finishes Sustainability of design Revision Additional Notes book Metals, timber, plastics, composites, smart and nanomaterials. Candidates should: be aware of the source of a range of materials, understand they are processed for use, and how they can be reused, recycled or disposed of, and the environmental consequences of their use; recognise the properties, working characteristics and combinations of metal, plastics, wood, composites and smart materials and nanomaterials. recognise the working characteristics of the common forms of metals; understand the differences between ferrous and non-ferrous metals and how they are used; know that the properties of metals can be changed by heat

treatments; know that metals can be combined to form alloys; recognise the working characteristics of common forms of plastics; understand the difference between thermoplastics and thermosetting plastics and how this affects the way they are used; know that smart materials have a reactive capacity; know that different materials can be combined to change their characteristics; recognise the working characteristics of the common forms of wood; know the difference between hardwoods and softwoods, and between natural timber and manufactured boards. know that nanomaterials can change the characteristics of a material when used to form a nanocomposite know about the selection of suitable components, pre-manufactured components adhesives and finishes; know about and use appropriate adhesives and finishes for a variety of materials and conditions; know about the use and application of a variety of components including fixings. Candidates should consider the choices of materials and processes and how they would impact on the life cycle of the product and its sustainability. GCSE Resistant Materials Topic Designing Revision Additional Notes book Candidates should be able to use a range of 2D/ 3D techniques to communicate ideas. Creativity Candidates should: generate a wide variety of ideas taking into consideration different possibilities of materials and processes; look to be creative, innovative and adventurous in these ideas. check design proposals against design specification; be able to consider modifying the specification in the light of design ideas and evaluation of them; review the design with the intention of reducing parts in order to simplify its construction or manufacture in

quantity Clarify the final design through decisions made through: modelling e.g. virtual, rapid prototype, modelling materials, constructional kits; client testing; consideration and selection materials consideration and selection of constructional details formal/CAD drawings. Use simple tests to check the effectiveness of designs and evaluate against the specification criteria. Candidates should: understand that designing and making reflect and influence cultures and societies; recognise that products have an impact on lifestyle; Social, cultural, moral, environmental, sustainability, economic issues Consumer rights Candidates should: understand the legislation, product sustainability and environmental issues maintenance and associated with the designing and making of codes of practice products; 6 Rs: repair, reduce, recycle, reuse, rethink, refuse. Moral, ethical and economical issues Candidates should be aware of the financial and human costs Health and Safety recognise that safety of the individual is Issues essential; take responsibility to ensure that hazards are minimised and the working environment is safe to use; observe health and safety regulations when working with tools, equipment, components and materials including the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Safety for the consumer Candidates should ensure that the end product is safe for the consumer. GCSE Resistant Materials Topic Processes and Manufacture Revision Additional Notes book Candidates should be aware of and use as appropriate, manufacturing processes and techniques including CAD and CAM. They should

have an industrial and commercial awareness and be familiar with the processes involved in manufacturing in quantity. Techniques and Processes Candidates should be aware of the selection and usage of appropriate tools and equipment, including CAD and CAM, for metal, plastics, wood, smart materials and composites. Preparation Candidates should be aware of the importance of preparing materials for use by techniques including degreasing, planing, sawing, cutting etc. Marking out Candidates should: have knowledge of, and be able to use marking out tools, equipment and processes including use of templates; use measurement systems with accuracy and have an understanding of the need to work within tolerance; understand the use of x, y, z co-ordinates in CAD and CAM systems. Cutting Candidates should be familiar with and able to use tools and equipment that are used for cutting commonly used materials. Shaping Candidates should be familiar with and able to use a range of tools and equipment that are used for shaping commonly used materials. Forming and bending Candidates should be familiar with and able to use a range of equipment that is used for forming and bending commonly used materials. GCSE Graphic Products Topic Revision Additional Notes book understand paper sizes A0 to A6 and their relationship to each other; know the units by which the thickness of paper, and board are measured; recognise the working characteristics of paper, board and other graphic materials; understand the properties and uses of different types of new (virgin), recycled and re-useable paper and board both as a media for communication and as a material for manufacturing products such as packaging; i.e. cartridge, layout, bleed proof, tracing, card, corrugated board, mount board, duplex, solid white board and grey board; understand that many paper based boards are laminated to other materials and that the composite can be adjusted to create different properties for specific purposes; understand the properties and uses of thermoplastics;

i.e. HIPs. PVC, Polypropylene (PP) and acetate; understand the properties of sheet and block modelling materials and their uses; i.e. Foam core board, corrugated plastic sheet and expanded polystyrene (Styrofoam) and machining foams; understand the use of spiral wound tubes; make judgements about cost, flexibility, finish, rigidity, strength, quality, weight, environmental and sustainable issues; know how to apply a quality finish to modelling materials including fillers and finishing with acrylic and water based paints; know the functions, uses and applications of smart/ modern materials; i.e. Precious Metal Clays (PMC) used in jewellery manufacture, corn starch polymers, paper foam and potatopak used in packaging and thermochromic pigments used for thermal warning patches. be able to use a full range of graphic equipment to develop hand-generated images; use a range of appropriate adhesives for different materials; i.e. PVA, epoxy resins, spray glues/hot glue, cements, tape and adhesive plastic film; use a range of hand and powered cutting and forming tools safely; i.e. scalpels and craft knives with mats, scissors, rotary cutters, compass cutters, fret saw, die cutter and creasing bars; use bought-in components where appropriate. i.e. fasten, seal, hang, join, bind, index; understand how graphic materials can be linked with other components and materials to produce a product designed for a specific purpose GCSE Graphic Products Topic Design and Designers Candidates should: recognise that designers are Market influencing new graphic products; recognise the style of the Influences work of the following designers: Harry Beck; Alberto Alessi; Jock Kinneir and Margaret Calvert; Wally Olins; Robert Sabuda Techniques Candidates should: be able to communicate a concept to a and potential client, manufacturer or purchaser; know the functions Processes of mock-ups, models and prototypes and the importance they can play in the design process; know how target marketing and gap in the market identification are used to promote a product. Sketching Candidates should: produce quality, annotated 2D and 3D freehand drawings; use crating/wire frame techniques to produce drawings; use grids and under-lays. Enhancement Candidates should: use pencils, pens and colour to add visual impact to designs and accentuate shape and form; use textural representation to convey different materials and surfaces; demonstrate an understanding of contrast, complementary, hue and tone; apply the language of colour; be aware of colour fusion and separation and its commercial application. Presentation Candidates should: demonstrate a knowledge of

computer graphic manipulation; generate and select suitable lettering; have a knowledge of encapsulation; use presentation drawings conceptualise the final design; use ICT to promote the final design to the client. Pictorial drawings Candidates should: produce one point and two point perspective sketches; produce isometric sketches. Working drawings Candidates should: use third angle orthographic projection to British Standard Conventions (BS8888, 2006); demonstrate use of self assembly, sectional and exploded drawings; use and understand scale drawings; interpret room, site plans and maps; Surface development (net) Candidates should: understand how 3D containers are manufactured from sheet material and be able to draw a net; demonstrate a knowledge of CAD/CAM to produce and manipulate surface development. Information drawings Candidates should: represent data in graphical form; i.e. 2D and 3D bar and pie charts, line graphs and pictographs; understand the language of labels and signage; understand the function and uses of corporate identity; produce ideograms, pictograms and symbols; produce flowcharts with feedback loops; produce sequential illustrations; produce schematic maps Revision book Additional Notes GCSE Graphic Products Topic Paper and Candidates should understand the construction and accuracy of card this work. Products and applications Candidates should: Engineering distinguish between quality of design and quality of manufacture; have an understanding of product life-cycle including design introduction, evolution, growth, maturity, decline and replacement; understand the needs and wants of customers; use criteria to judge the quality of a graphic product i.e. meeting a need, fitness of purpose, appropriate use of materials and time. Evaluation techniques Candidates should: know why evaluation is important and its contribution to designing an on-going product improvement; identify the role end-users and others play in evaluation; identify ways in which a product can be tested or evaluated; test the outcomes against the original specification; produce a summative evaluation of their final outcome against their original specification. Social, Candidates should: recognise that graphical images and Cultural, products should not offend minority groups; consider moral and Moral, cultural implications of graphic products; consider ergonomics

Environmen and use of anthropometric data when designing products; tal, understand symbols and signs which are essential information on Economic packaging. Economic Candidates should: understand the and materials and social costs of packaging; have an awareness of Sustainabili planned obsolescence. ty Issues Sustainability Candidates should: be aware of the 6 Rs rules repair, reduce, recycle, re-use, re-think, refuse; consider environmental issues related to graphic products; understand the reasons for and consequences of, the increased and reduced use of product packaging; be aware of the advantages and disadvantages of re-cycling and re-using materials. Information Candidates should: identify the component parts of a CAD/CAM and system; recognise different CAD/CAM and ICT input and output Communica devices and their function; select and use appropriate CAD tion software; select and use appropriate ICT and graphic software; Technology know the benefits and costs of CAD/CAM and ICT; produce virtual reality models using CAD software; know that the electronic transfer of data permits designing and manufacturing activities to take place in different geographic locations; use photographic evidence; use photographic evidence from any source including digital or video record any stages during Design and Manufacture and promotion. Revision book Additional Notes GCSE Graphic Products Topic Health and Candidates should: be aware of information regarding the safe safety handling of tools, materials, components and equipment; issues recognise hazards, understand risk assessment and take steps to control the risks to themselves and others; recognise information relating to legislation intended to protect the public; recognise symbols and signs relating to quality assurance endorsed by recognised authorities; use information to assess the immediate and cumulative risks; manage their environment to ensure the health and safety of themselves and others. Processes Candidates are expected to be able to make products using a and range of materials and processes suitable for one-off or small Manufactur scale production. They should have an understanding of the e commercial manufacture of graphic products and the increasing

role of CAD/CAM at all levels. Systems and control procedures Candidates should: identify input, process, output and feedback in the production of a graphic product; draw up a logical order of work and know how this changes as the scale of production increases; produce a flow chart of a manufacturing system and show feedback; recognise the quality control marks and symbols used in the printing industry i.e. registration marks, colour bar and crop marks; understand the principles of simple mechanisms and identify the relevant components and features i.e. levers, linkages, audio/visual programmable ICs. Industrial Practices Candidates should: understand how the method of production changes from single to multiple production; demonstrate a sequence of making tasks that show how and when decisions are made; understand the importance of producing scale models and prototypes in product development; understand the different demands of different scales of production; have an awareness of just in time production (JIT). understand how common graphical products are designed and manufactured; understand how and why quality checks are made in production; demonstrate an awareness of commercial printing and packaging methods; i.e. lithography, flexography, gravure, screen printing and digital printing; match production method to best printing methods for a range of graphic products; know the four processing colours and understand special colours are also used; understand print finishes used in printing, varnishing, laminating, embossing and foil application; know how multiple surface developments (nets) are produced by the use of die cutting; identify devices used to form shapes, position features and aid repetition; demonstrate the reduction of waste and show economical use of materials; understand the function and need for packaging: protection, need in transportation, storage, security, display, giving consumer information. have a knowledge and understanding that design ideas are protected in law through copyright, patents and registered designs. Revision book Additional Notes GCSE Graphic Products Topic Revision book Additional Notes

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