Political Developments in the Early Republic - Weebly

Political Developments in the Early Republic - Weebly

Political Developments in the Early Republic How did the Federalists and Republicans differ in their vision for the United States? Preview The song you are about to hear is called "Hail, Columbia." It was first performed at

George Washington's inauguration in 1789. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPlQS1pzHdA Read the lyrics as you listen to the song. Write down your answers to the first two questions on the Preview. Preview

The next song is a campaign song from the 1800 presidential election. This song was sung by members of the Republican party, one of the nations first political parties. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7z09FEjXAh8 Read the lyrics as you listen to the song. Write down your answers to the questions on the Preview. Preview

As shown by the differences in these two songs, the nation changed greatly in its first decade. Preview As shown by the differences in these two songs, the nation changed greatly in its first decade. In addition, two strong political parties emerged, the Federalists and the Republicans.

In this lesson, you will learn how the Federalists and Republicans differed in their visions for America. Introduction On page 205 of History Alive!, read the introduction aloud 1. Why might George Washington have been reluctant to become president?

2. Why did George Washington choose Hamilton and Jefferson to serve in his cabinet? 3. Why do think Hamilton and Jefferson became political rivals? Section 11.2 Read Section 11.2 11.3 Complete 11.2 & 11.3 of your handout

Section 11.2 Section 11.3 Was the Whiskey Rebellion Constitutional? Why or why not? In Washingtons Farewell Address, he warned the country about

the threat of spirit of party. How is spirit of party affecting the nation today? Section 11.411.5 Go up to the poster paper on the board and add a couple items to the Venn Diagram of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson. Please write very neatly in marker. Take a picture of it

when its finished. Activity: Hamilton vs. Jefferson Debate rules 1. Divide the class evenly into Hamiltons and Jeffersons 2. Face one another seated (on each side of the room) 3. To get a turn, you must repeat or paraphrase what your

opponent said 4. Stand when speaking 5. If it is not your turn, do not talk! Practice active listening Activity: Hamilton vs. Jefferson Hamilton I believe that most people are basically selfish and

Jefferson Okay, so you believe that most people are selfish andI believe that you dont have to tell people how to think. Arent people capable of making good decisions on their own? Hamilton All right, you believe that people can make their own

decisions. The truth is that government needs to Activity: Hamilton vs. Jefferson We will debate these four issues: 1. View of Human Nature 2. Best Form of Government 3. Views on the Economy

4. Views on Great Britain and France Activity: Hamilton vs. Jefferson If you are Jefferson, stand up and recite the Republican

slogan together: We know what we need from day to day! Dont try to rule us from far away! Now sit back down Activity: Hamilton vs. Jefferson If you are

Hamilton, stand up and recite the Federalist slogan together: Born to rule, we know what we need! With a strong central government, we will succeed! Now sit back down

Activity: Hamilton vs. Jefferson How did it feel to represent Thomas Jefferson or Alexander Hamilton? What was the Republicans' vision for the United States? What was the Federalists' vision for the United States? Back to your seats.

Activity: Hamilton vs. Jefferson If you were living in 1800, would you have been a Republican or a Federalist? Why? Activity: Hamilton vs. Jefferson If you were living in 1800, would you have been a Republican or

a Federalist? Why? Section 11.6 Read Section 11.6 The Presidency of John Adams Complete 11.6 of your handout Section 11.6

Contribute to one of the blank posters on the wall. Choose one poster on the wall to write on. You will urge state legislatures to nullify the Alien and Sedition Acts. With a partner, include at least two reasons for nullification and one simple illustration. Section 11.6 Section 11.7

With a partner, create a banner on a blank sheet of lined paper. Write a campaign slogan for the 1800 presidential election. Choose from either a Federalist perspective or a Republican perspective. Be sure to include the name of the candidate and a reason he should be elected. For example: A strong foreign policy is what we need! With John Adams as president, we will succeed! Make it colorful, but simple and effective. When you are finished, elect a campaign manager and deliver it as a group for that campaign to Mrs. Masudas class. Be polite and introduce yourselves as

working for the campaign of your candidate for the election of 1800. Tell their class that you encourage them to vote for your candidate! Section 11.8 1. Why was the Twelfth Amendment added to the Constitution and what does it prevent?

2. What was significant about the election of 1800? Section 11.8 1. Why was the Twelfth Amendment added to the Constitution and what does it prevent? The Twelfth Amendment was added to the Constitution to prevent ties in presidential races. The amendment prevents a

tie by establishing separate ballots for president and vice president. 2. What was significant about the election of 1800? The Election of 1800 showed that the new system of government worked. The nation witness a peaceful transfer of power, even despite the crisis of the election.

Processing Activity You are a campaign manager for one of the presidential candidates in 1800. Create a campaign song for your candidate. Your song can be to any tune you choose. Your song must clearly describe the Federalist or the Republican vision for the U.S., contain at least two reasons why your candidate should be

elected, and use language that reflects the passionate feelings held by Federalists or Republicans. Reading Further Read pp. 220223 and discuss/debate the following question with your partner: What kind of home should the president live in?

Geography Challenge Begin the Geography Challenge handout Be sure to read pp. 202203 critically first Also study the map and graph carefully Geography Challenge Answers

Score 1 point for each correct answer. Use the map on the previous page to check shading and labeling. 1. There were 13 new states added from 1791 to 1838, for a total of 26. 2. Five new statesLouisiana, Indiana, Mississippi, Illinois, and Alabamawere admitted during the 1810s, the most of any decade. 3. Maine was the only state added to the Union in the early 1800s that is not west of the Appalachians.

4. New York City was the nations capital when Washington became president. 5. The Erie Canal connected Lake Erie and the Hudson River. 6. Tennessee is the home state of Andrew Jackson. 7. The Cherokee were forcibly moved west along the Trail of Tears. It began around northwestern Georgia and ended west of Arkansas. Geography Challenge Answers Questions may have more than one correct answer. Score 1 to 3 points for each

reasonable answer, depending on the strength of students geographic reasoning. Possible answers are given here. 8. Jackson was the nations 1st president not from an eastern state. His election might not have succeeded without the support of a growing population in the West. 9. Answers and opinions will vary. The Cherokee were removed to free up the land for white settlers. 10. Possible answer: An event like the War of 1812, with the threats to the homeland

that it presented, might serve to unite Americans and increase their sense of patriotism.

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