Office of Children's Health Protection United States ...

Office of Children's Health Protection United States ...

1 Federal Actions to Eliminate Lead Poisoning Warren Friedman, PhD, CIH, FAIHA Senior Advisor, Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, US Department of Housing and Urban Development Co-Chair, Lead Subcommittee, Presidents Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children Montefiore Conference on Lead Poisoning Prevention: Federal Action Plan To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Product of Presidents Task Force on Environmental Impacts

Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children EPA and HHS are the Task Force co-chairs CDC, EPA, HUD co-chair the Lead Subcommittee The Action Plan is a blueprint for reducing lead exposure through collaboration among federal agencies and with stakeholders (e.g., states, tribes, local communities, businesses, nonprofits, healthcare providers, educators, property owners/managers, parents, etc.) 2 Presidents Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children 3

The Childrens Environmental Health Task Force (its informal name*) has a long record of lead activities, e.g.: 2000: Eliminating Childhood Lead Poisoning: A Federal Stra tegy Targeting Lead Paint Hazards 2016: Key Federal Programs to Reduce Childhood Lead Exp osures and Eliminate Associated Health Impacts 2018:

Federal Action Plan To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health The Action Plan details federal objectives and Impacts actions under four goals: 1. Reduce childrens exposure to lead sources. 2. Identify lead-exposed children and improve their health outcomes. 3. Communicate more effectively with stakeholders. 4. Support and conduct critical research to inform efforts to reduce lead exposures and related health risks. 4 Overview of the Action Plan

The Action Plan is a roadmap for describing federal-wide actions to collectively reduce childhood lead exposure and improve childrens health. It is NOT a budget document, but it is expected to inform future federal budget and regulatory development processes. It can be used to enhance collaborative federal efforts, and track progress toward improving childrens environmental health. It is focused on highly exposed communities and 5 Overview of the Action Plan The key primary prevention priority is to reduce

childrens exposure to legacy sources, including deteriorated paint in housing, lead service lines contaminating drinking water, and contaminated soil. The key secondary prevention priority is to identify children who have been exposed and improve their health outcomes. The Action Plan describes only federal activities, but many of them will be informed by or will encourage partnerships with non-federal 6 Status Reports for Federal Actions Supporting the Federal Lead Action Plan 7

The federal Lead Action Plan is posted on the Task Force website, https://ptfceh.niehs.nih.gov, and will have future updates on actions by agencies, e.g.: April 1, 2019 - EPA released its first status report via www.epa.gov/lead October 2019 - First HUD report to be released via www.hud.gov/lead Federal Actions Supporting the Federal Lead Action Plan This presentation will provide:

An overview of the Plans goals and objectives Sample CDC, EPA and HUD actions, to prompt suggestions for participation and enhancement 8 9 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead Sources Objective 1.1: Reduce Childrens Exposure in Homes and Child-Occupied Facilities with Lead-Based Paint Hazards

EPA: Lowered dust-lead hazard standards for floors and windowsills in pre-1978 housing and childoccupied facilities ( www.federalregister.gov/d/2019-14024) (7/9) EPA: Has begun rulemaking on post-abatement lead clearance standards (expected 7/2021) Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead Sources 1.1: Reduce Childrens Exposure in Homes and Child-Occupied Facilities with Lead-Based Paint Hazards HUD: Expand prioritization of Lead Hazard Reduction grants to highest-exposure risk homes, neighborhoods, and communities: two of three 2019 grant categories HUD: Awarded $314 M in 77 Lead Hazard Reduction grants to states and local governments (9/30/2019)

10 HUD 2019 Lead Hazard Control & Healthy Homes Grants Healthy State Grantee Program Lead$ Total$ CT CT NJ NJ NJ NJ NY NY NY

NY NY NY NY New Haven Norwich Bergen County East Orange Irvington Township Newark Elmira Erie County Genesee County Niagara County Onondaga County Rochester Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe

LHRD LBPHC LBPHC LHRD LBPHC LHRD LBPHC LHRD LBPHC LHRD LHRD LHRD HHPTH $5,000,000 $2,655,058 $3,000,000 $3,000,000

$3,000,000 $5,000,000 $1,013,388 $5,000,000 $1,000,000 $2,500,000 $5,000,000 $5,000,000 Homes$ $600,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $600,000 $280,000 $600,000 $300,000

$250,000 $600,000 $600,000 11 $5,600,000 $2,955,058 $3,300,000 $3,300,000 $3,300,000 $5,600,000 $1,293,388 $5,600,000 $1,300,000 $2,750,000 $5,600,000 $5,600,000

N/A $1,000,000 $1,000,000 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead Sources 1.1: Reduce Childrens Exposure in Homes and Child-Occupied Facilities with Lead-Based Paint Hazards EPA: Target outreach campaigns to home renovation contractors to increase the number (or percentage) of certified renovation, repair and painting (RRP) firms HUD: Provide technical information for EPAs dustlead hazard standards rule and lead clearance levels rule 12 13

Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead Sources 1.2: Reduce Exposure to Lead from Drinking Water HUD & EPA: Establish EPA-HUD Drinking Water Task Force that is currently focusing on lead EPA: Revise the Lead and Copper Rule re best available peer reviewed science, and enhance its implementation EPA: Implement Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act grants ($43 M in FY18-19) to small & disadvantaged 14 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead Sources 1.2: Reduce Exposure to Lead from Drinking Water

HUD: Encourage CDBG recipients to consider using CDBG funds for lead service line replacement in low-to-moderate income neighborhoods. HUD: Harmonize meaning of drinking water quality terms in HUD regulations. 15 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead Sources 1.3: Reduce Exposure to Lead in Soil HUD: Include soil-lead hazard evaluation and control in Lead Hazard Control grants and Lead Safe Housing Rule EPA/OLEM, HHS/ATSDR: Evaluate and manage lead contamination at Superfund, RCRA corrective action sites HUD & EPA: Collaborating on lead exposures at

HUD-assisted housing on or near Superfund sites Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead Sources 1.4: Reduce Exposure to Lead Associated with Emissions to Ambient Air EPA: Reduce number of areas violating the lead National Ambient Air Quality Standard for lead, by working with state and tribal air agencies EPA & DOT/FAA: Evaluate impacts of lead emissions from aircraft using leaded aviation fuel 16 17 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead

Sources 1.5: Reduce Lead Exposure from Occupational Sources HUD: Invoke OSHA worker protection requirements in lead hazard control grant program HUD: Provide technical info. if OSHA issues advanced notice of proposed rulemaking on its lead standards HUD: Collaborate with HHS/NIEHS Worker Training Program on increasing lead awareness by HUD- Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead Sources 1.6: Reduce Exposure to Lead in Food HHS/FDA Reevaluate the provisional tolerable total dietary lead intake level Consider increased monitoring of domestic and imported foods for lead

Consider whether to establish maximum lead levels in foods by regulation or by guidance Participate in decreasing the Codex Alimentarius General Standard maximum levels for lead in food 18 19 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead Sources 1.7: Reduce Lead Exposure to Lead in Cosmetics and Personal Care Products - FDA Continue monitoring domestic and imported cosmetics for lead impurities Participate in international lead reduction efforts Monitor, post results of lead levels in cosmetic products

Issue final guidance for a maximum lead level in cosmetic products 20 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead Sources 1.8: Reduce Exposure to Lead in Consumer Products CPSC Continue to enforce regulations regarding lead content and lead paint limits for consumer products Continue to enforce labeling requirements to prevent consumer product-related lead exposure Work internationally to improve foreign suppliers compliance with U.S. lead-based paint and total lead content requirements Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 1: Reduce Childrens Exposure to Lead

Sources 1.9: Reduce Lead Exposure Through Enforcement and Compliance Assistance HUD: Conduct administrative enforcement of Lead Disclosure Rule (rent or buy pre-1978 housing) (200 K units so far made lead safe per settlement agreements) HUD, EPA, DOJ: Conduct administrative enforcement of Lead Safe Housing Rule (assisted pre-1978 housing) HUD, EPA: Provide compliance assistance for homes and communities with lead-based paint, lead-contaminated drinking water, and lead-contaminated soil problems 21 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 2. Identify Lead-Exposed Children and Improve Their Health Outcomes

2.1: 22 Improve Surveillance of Blood Lead Levels to Identify Children Exposed to Lead HHS/CDC/NCEH: Evaluate updating childrens blood lead reference value HUD: Evaluate grant programs with state, tribal, and local partners to identify best practices and gaps in services to address in new funding opportunities CDC: Refine national health objectives (e.g., Healthy People 2030) for childrens BLLs to focus on highest risk populations Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 2. Identify Lead-Exposed Children and Improve Their Health Outcomes 2.1:

23 Improve Surveillance of Blood Lead Levels to Identify Children Exposed to Lead CMS, CDC, USDA: Explore improving utility of required blood testing in Medicaid and the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) CDC: Conduct targeted screening surveys and/or small-area prevalence studies to identify localities with high lead exposure risk HHS/HIS, CDC, EPA, HUD, USDA: Better understand childhood lead exposures through collaboration with tribal partners; improve federal programs. 24 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 2. Identify Lead-Exposed Children and Improve Their Health Outcomes

2.2: Facilitate Follow-up Blood Lead Testing and Monitoring of Children Identified as Lead-Exposed CDC, CMS, HUD: Enhance ways to work with state, tribal and local communities to match children identified as lead-exposed with local environmental assessment services and enhanced health services ATSDR, EPA/OCHP: Support Pediatric Env. H. Specialty Units* in increasing # of obstetricians, pediatricians, nurses, and with continuing education on prevention, diagnosis, management and treatment of lead exposure Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 2. Identify Lead-Exposed Children and Improve Their Health Outcomes 2.2: Facilitate Follow-up Blood Lead Testing and Monitoring of Children Identified as Lead-Exposed HUD: Conduct collaborative outreach and education by lead hazard control grantees to

identify lead-exposed children and refer them for evaluation HUD: Use Mayors Challenges (through National League of Cities), Community Build Events, etc., to identify lead-exposed children and refer them for evaluation 25 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 2: Identify Lead-Exposed Children and Improve Their Health Outcomes 2.3: 26 Facilitate Screening for Developmental Delays in Children Identified as Lead-Exposed CDC, NIH Shriver Institute: Work in and outside

government where surveillance has identified children with higher BLLs. CDC, NIH Shriver Institute: Encourage primary care and other providers to promote developmental monitoring by providing CDCs Learn the Signs. Act Early to parents and other caregivers when a child under five years of age has documented lead exposure; enhance online visibility of the Learn the Signs website materials. 27 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 2: Identify Lead-Exposed Children and Improve Their Health Outcomes 2.4: Facilitate Referrals and Receipt of Appropriate Services for Children Identified as At-Risk for Developmental Delays Due to Lead Exposure EPA, ATSDR: Provide PEHSUs and public health agencies with resources on effective treatments for

disorders and for developmental monitoring related to lead exposures HUD: Use lead hazard control grantees to be local subject matter experts for state-coordinated care leadership, PEHSUs, and local health care providers Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 3: Communicate More Effectively 3.1: 28 Consolidate and Streamline Federal LeadRelated Communication and Messaging CEHTF: Create online portal to enhance, consolidate and streamline federal-wide public lead communication, with links to agency-specific information CEHTF: Enhance local partnerships with community organizations, local health agencies,

faith-based organizations and private philanthropies on lead-based paint hazards, and to Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 3: Communicate More Effectively 3.1: Consolidate and Streamline Federal LeadRelated Communication and Messaging HUD, CDC, EPA, USDA: Partnering on outreach campaigns with heavy lead emphasis: Natl. Healthy Homes Month (June) Natl. Lead Pois. Prev. Week (last full week of October) Interagency online NLPPW Toolkit: Outreach materials to help stakeholders conduct their 29 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 3:

Communicate More Effectively 3.2: 30 Improve Awareness of Lead Hazards, Prevention and Remediation among Diverse Populations, Especially Those Most at Risk CEHTF: Use Childrens Centers, PEHSUs to develop appropriate, evidence-based lead exposure prevention and intervention communication materials; disseminate through established community partnerships. HUD: Developed, w/CDC, EPA, 2nd edition of Lead Paint Safety Field Guide, a highly graphic step-bystep outline of lead-safe maintenance work Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 3: Communicate More Effectively 3.2:

31 Improve Awareness of Lead Hazards, Prevention and Remediation among Diverse Populations, Especially Those Most at Risk HUD: Develop disaster recovery curriculum for National Preparedness Month w/lead and healthy homes content HUD: Including lead safety in four new Healthy Homes booklets for Native Americans (Sept. 2019) Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 3: Communicate More Effectively 3.2: 32 Improve Awareness of Lead Hazards, Prevention

and Remediation among Diverse Populations, Especially Those Most at Risk EPA, HUD: Supporting National Lead Information Clearinghouse (800-424-LEAD), operated for EPA EPA, HUD: Held Mid-Atlantic Lead and Healthy Homes Summit, Baltimore (June 2019), several regional EPA/HHS/HUD lead forums, etc. Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 4: Prioritize and Address the Critical Research and Data Needs to Inform Lead Policies and Guide Decisions 33 4.1: Conduct Lead Research CEHTF: Enhance and apply data and tools (e.g., models or approaches) and determine the key

drivers of blood lead levels from multimedia exposures to inform lead regulatory decisions and site assessments CEHTF: Generate data, maps and mapping tools to identify high exposure communities or locations and disparities for prioritization efforts to reduce childrens blood lead levels Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 4: Prioritize and Address the Critical Research and Data Needs to Inform Lead Policies and Guide Decisions 34 4.1: Conduct Lead Research CEHTF: Generate data to address critical gaps for reducing uncertainty in lead modeling and mapping

for exposure/risk analyses and for estimating population-wide health benefits of actions to reduce lead exposures CEHTF: Identify approaches to prevent, mitigate and communicate about lead exposures and risks in exposed communities Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 4: Prioritize and Address the Critical Research and Data Needs to Inform Lead Policies and Guide Decisions 4.1: Conduct Lead Research CEHTF: Evaluate the effectiveness of actions (e.g., interventions, programs, policies, enforcement) to prevent lead exposure, mitigate health effects and communicate on lead exposures/risks

35 Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 4: Prioritize and Address the Critical Research and Data Needs to Inform Lead Policies and Guide Decisions 36 4.1: Conduct Lead Research HUD: Co-planning with EPA and HHS (CDC, NIEHS) a multi-agency lead research workshop to initiate a plan to address highest priority research HUD: Award Lead Technical Studies grants to research agencies, firms, organizations (Sept. 2019, 2020) (FY19 pre-applications due 7/11/2019 11:59 PM ET)

Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 4: Prioritize and Address the Critical Research and Data Needs to Inform Lead Policies and Guide Decisions 37 4.1: Conduct Lead Research HUD: Complete field work, and data analysis and reporting for American Healthy Homes Survey II to determine progress in reducing the prevalence of US homes with LBP hazards; first national survey of lead service lines (2018-2020) HUD: Evaluate enhanced inspection methods for the condition of assisted housing, soliciting comments until 10/15/2019 ( www.federalregister.gov/d/2019-17455)

Examples of Key Federal Actions Goal 4: Prioritize and Address the Critical Research and Data Needs to Inform Lead Policies and Guide Decisions 4.2: Establish the Lead Exposure and Prevention Advisory Committee CDC: Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act has CDC/ATSDR set up LEPAC with health and education professionals, at least half federal, to review research and federal programs and services, and identify effective services and best practices for addressing and preventing lead exposure and its impacts in communities 38 39

References Task Force website: https://ptfceh.niehs.nih.gov/ Lead Subcommittee co-chair agencies lead websites: CDC: www.cdc.gov/lead EPA: www.epa.gov/lead HUD: www.hud.gov/lead National Lead Information Clearinghouse: 800-424LEAD HUD Lead Regulations hotline: 202-402-7698

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Deposition, Weathering, and Erosion

    Deposition, Weathering, and Erosion

    The type of sand is determined by the sediment on the ocean floor. White sand. Black sand. Deposition by Waves. Deposition by Wind. Wind is the weakest agent of deposition. When it drops the sediment it is carrying, ... Deposition,...
  • WJEC Geography GCSE Mainstream Syllabus A

    WJEC Geography GCSE Mainstream Syllabus A

    This is the UK's biggest employment sector and includes: Retailing The Armed Forces Entertainment Even sport stars! Employment Structures All jobs can be categorised into three main employment types Primary Secondary Tertiary In the 1980's a fourth sector called Quaternary...
  • PAF 101 Module 2, Lecture 9 You miss

    PAF 101 Module 2, Lecture 9 You miss

    Admissions forms that Seton Hall University mailed to tens of thousands of prospective students abroad contained a misprinted telephone number that instead connected callers to a phone-sex line, the Newark, N.J., ... Macy's Buying & Planning. Macy's & PRIVATE BRAND...
  • Instrument Ground Training Module 2 Randy Schoephoerster www.airtreknorth.com

    Instrument Ground Training Module 2 Randy Schoephoerster www.airtreknorth.com

    EXAMPLE: A 150° heading change using a standard-rate turn would take 50 sec.(150° * 3°/sec. = 50 sec.) Rule of Thumb: (Airspeed/10) +7 = Standard Rate Turn Bank Angle. 2. A turn and slip indicator may be calibrated as 2...
  • Snímek 1 - ssos-sou.cz

    Snímek 1 - ssos-sou.cz

    Výukový materiál zpracovaný v rámci projektu Registrační číslo projektu CZ.1.07/1.5.00/340618 Šablona: III/2 Sada: 6/2 Výstup: VY_32_INOVACE_6PO208
  • PRESENTATION TITLE - University Of Illinois

    PRESENTATION TITLE - University Of Illinois

    One of the samples is also colored and has been coated with nano-particles. * Guess! Feel both of the samples and guess which one has the nano-particles. How are they different? * Magic Sand The red sample has the nano-particles....
  • Podcasting for Learning

    Podcasting for Learning

    Video Sharing Video Games Library Service Delivery Professional Development Student-created Content for Learning Information Literacy Teacher-Librarian's Toolkit Directory & Aggregator Audio Content when you want it, where you want it. ... with photo markers Audio only WRDSB Book Intros: OLA...
  • Animal Systems - brookville.k12.oh.us

    Animal Systems - brookville.k12.oh.us

    Body Orientation (used in humans) The Anatomical Position: The anatomical position describes a person that is standing erect with the feet facing forwards, arms hanging to the sides, and the palms of the hands facing forward.Directional terms are always from...