Leaders Book

Leaders Book

LEADERS BOOK INDEX CHAPTERS SSG SMITHS LEADERS BOOK 1. PERSONNEL DATA 2. TRAINING MANAGEMENT 3. BATTLE FOCUS 4. CHAIN OF COMMAND 5. EQUIPMENT DATA 6. REFERENCES IMMORTALS CHAPTER 1 PERSONAL DATA: LEADERS BIOGRAPHY PRIVACY ACT STATEMENT SOLDIERS PERSONAL DATA SHEET ERB PROMOTION WORKSHEET COUNSELING TRACKER NCOER TRACKER AWARDS TRACKER REENLISTMENT DATA SENSITIVE ITEMS

WEAPONS QUALIFICATION STATS APFT STATS NOTES LEADERS BIOGRAPHY PRIVACY ACT STATEMENT AUTHORITY: Title 5, Section 3012; Title 10, USC, E.O. 9397 PRINCIPAL PURPOSES: To permit the Chain of Command to maintain information and records vital to the soldier and necessary to the Chain of Command in case of emergencies. ROUTINE USES: To update information required by the military for daily purposes. Information furnished may be disclosed to DOD officials who need this information to perform their duties; the American Red Cross; and relatives. The SSN is used for positive identification. DISCLOSURE: Voluntary. Disclosure of SSN is voluntary. NAME: SMITH, JOE. SSN: 123-45-6789 RANK / DOR: SSG/1 Jan 05 DATE / PLACE OF BIRTH: 01 July 85/Arlington, WA CIVILIAN EDUCATION: ## Credits MILITARY EDUCATION: PLDC, BNCOC, COMSEC Custodian Course, UPL, FBCB2, DVIT ASSIGNMENT: 527th MP CO, HHC 2nd BDE 10 MTN, HHC DISCOM 1AD, HHC 1/8 INF (M), 984th MP CO AWARDS: NDSM x2, GCM x5, AAM x6, ARCOM x 3, OSR x4, ASR, NCOPD, ACM-CS x1, GWTSM, NATO Medal x2 SOLDIER PRIVACY ACT STATEMENT The personnel listed below authorize _______________________ to maintain their SSN and personal information in his/her Leaders Book with the understanding that this information will not be disclosed except in the line of his/her official duties. NAME SSN SIGNATUER DATE SOLDIERS PERSONAL DATA SHEET NAME : _________________________RANK : ______DOR : ______________ SSN : __________________ BASD : ________________ETS : __________________DOB : _____________ MOS : _________________ TIG : __________________TIS : ____________PROMOTABLE : YES / NO POINTS : _____________ WEIGHT : ________ HEIGHT : ________ HAIR : ___________ EYES : __________ AGE : _________ MARITAL STATUS : MARRIED / SINGLE / DIVORCED / SEPERATED SPOUSES NAME : ________________________________ EFMP : YES / NO CHILDS NAME : _________________________________AGE : ____MALE / FEMALE EFMP : YES / NO

CHILDS NAME : _________________________________ AGE : ____MALE / FEMALE EFMP : YES / NO CHILDS NAME : _________________________________ AGE : ____MALE / FEMALE EFMP : YES / NO CHILDS NAME : _________________________________ AGE : ____MALE / FEMALE EFMP : YES / NO HOME PHONE : __________________________ ADDRESS : _____________________________________________ RELIGION : ___________ BLOOD TYPE : ___ MASK # : _________ INSERT REQUIRED : YES / NO DATE WEIGH-IN : ___________ BODY FAT % : _____ PROFILE : T / P _______________________________ DATE DRIVERS TRAINING : __________________________ JSLIST SUIT SIZE : _______ MASK SIZE : __________ ACU COAT SIZE : _ TROUSER SIZE : _______ PC SIZE : _______ BOOT SIZE : _____ DATE WLC : _____ AWARDS: __________________________________________________________________ DATE LAST GCM : _____________ DATE LAST NCOER : ___________ NEXT OF KIN : _________________ ADDRESS : ____________________________________________________ PHONE NO. : __________________ SOLDIERS PERSONAL DATA SHEET NAME : _________________________RANK : ______DOR : ______________ SSN : __________________ BASD : ________________ETS : __________________DOB : _____________ MOS : _________________ TIG : __________________TIS : ____________PROMOTABLE : YES / NO POINTS : _____________ WEIGHT : ________ HEIGHT : ________ HAIR : ___________ EYES : __________ AGE : _________ MARITAL STATUS : MARRIED / SINGLE / DIVORCED / SEPERATED SPOUSES NAME : ________________________________ EFMP : YES / NO CHILDS NAME : _________________________________AGE : ____MALE / FEMALE EFMP : YES / NO CHILDS NAME : _________________________________ AGE : ____MALE / FEMALE EFMP : YES / NO CHILDS NAME : _________________________________ AGE : ____MALE / FEMALE EFMP : YES / NO CHILDS NAME : _________________________________ AGE : ____MALE / FEMALE EFMP : YES / NO HOME PHONE : __________________________ ADDRESS : _____________________________________________ RELIGION : ___________ BLOOD TYPE : ___ MASK # : _________ INSERT REQUIRED : YES / NO DATE WEIGH-IN : ___________ BODY FAT % : _____ PROFILE : T / P _______________________________ DATE DRIVERS TRAINING : __________________________ JSLIST SUIT SIZE : _______ MASK SIZE : __________ ACU COAT SIZE : _ TROUSER SIZE : _______ PC SIZE : _______ BOOT SIZE : _____ DATE WLC : _____ AWARDS:

__________________________________________________________________ DATE LAST GCM : _____________ DATE LAST NCOER : ___________ NEXT OF KIN : _________________ ADDRESS : ____________________________________________________ PHONE NO. : __________________ ERB PROMOTION WORKSHEET NCOER TRACKER COUNSELING TRACKER NAME LAST NEXT REASON NAME FROM THRU REASON AWARDS TRACKER NAME SUBMITTED AWARD AWARDS TRACKER REASON NAME SUBMITTED AWARD REASON REENLISTMENT DATA NAME RE-UP OPEN RE-UP CLOSE

PCS DATE REENLISTMENT DATA ETS DATE NAME RE-UP OPEN RE-UP CLOSE PCS DATE ETS DATE CHAPTER 2 TRAINING MANAGEMENT: 8 STEP TRAINING MODEL WEAPONS QUALIFICATION STATS APFT STATS PCC CHECKLIST DEPLOYMENT SEQUENCE OF EVENTS AFTER ACTION REVIEW RISK ASSESSMENT 8 STEP TRAINING MODEL PLAN TRAIN LEADERS RECON

1. Training Objectives 2. Soldiers to Train 3. Trainers/Evaluators 4. Land/Facilities 5. Equipment/Supplies 6. References & TTPs 7. Risk Assessment 1. Train Leaders First 2. Focus on Doctrine, Basics, & Standards 3. Classroom Instruction 4. Performance Tests 5. Written Tests 6. On Site Certification 1. Recon Training Site, 2. Route, & Obstacles 3. Terrain Walk Done 4. With Key Leaders ISSUE ORDER REHEARSE 1. .Situation 1. Leaders and OCs 2. Enemy 2. Reduced Force 3. Friendly 3. Sand Table 4. Attachments & 4. Rock Drill Detachments 5. TEWT 5. Mission 6. Full Force 6. Execution 7. Force on Force Concept of Operation Coordination Instructions 7. Service and Support Concept of Logistics, 8. Materiel, and Medical Evacuation Command and Signal CONDUCT AAR 1. Review Training Objectives 2. Establish What Happened 3. Establish Why It Happened 4. Determine What Was Right 5. Determine What Was Wrong 6. Determine What Should Be 7. Done Differently Next Time EXECUTE 1. Precombat Checks 2. Focus on Doctrine,

3. Basics, & Standards 4. Coach Frequently 5. Control Environment 6. Develop Teamwork 7. Increase Complexity 8. Make Training Realistic 9. Ensure Participation RETRAIN 1. Alternate Instructor 2. Focus on Weakness WEAPONS QUALIFICATION STATISTICS NAME WEAPON SCORE WEAPONS QUALIFICATION STATISTICS LVL DATE NAME WEAPON SCORE LVL DATE APFT DATA (DIAGNOSTIC) APFT DATA (RECORD) NAME P/U S/U RUN DATE TOTAL NAME P/U S/U

RUN DATE TOTAL DEPLOYMENT SEQUENCE OF EVENTS PRE-COMBAT CHECKLIST H + 00:00 _____ PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY _____ PERSONNEL HYGIENE ITEMS _____ INDIVIDUAL TA-50 _____ SEASONAL CLOTHING ITEMS _____ ID TAGS, ID CARD _____ DRIVERS LICENSE _____ WATER JUGS (FILLED) _____ FUEL CANS (FULL) _____ STOVES W/ ALL PARTS _____ TENTS/ NETS/ POLE BAGS/ STAKES _____ CAMMO NETS _____ MAPS/ OVERLAYS _____ COMMO EQUIPMENT(BATTERIES, WIRE) _____ COMSEC (ANCD) _____ WEAPONS( INDIVIDUAL/CREW SERVE) _____ NVGS W/ BATTERIES _____ AID BAGS _____ VEHICLES( TOPPED OFF,LOADED,DISPATCHED, PMCS, -10 MANUALS) _____ 254S (GOGGLES) _____ SUPPLIES (ALCOHOL,MARKERS,PENS,ECT) _____ ALL SURVEY EQUIPMENT _____ MAP BOARDS _____ COTS ALERT NOTIFICATION H + 00:30 ___________________________________________ H + 01:00 ___________________________________________ H + 01:30 ___________________________________________ H + 02:00 PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY H + 03:00 ___________________________________________ H + 04:00 ___________________________________________ H + 05:00 PRE-COMBAT INSPECTIONS H + 06:00 ___________________________________________ H + 09:00

___________________________________________ H + 12:00 ___________________________________________ H + 15:00 AFTER ACTION REVIEW PLAN Establish objectives for AAR Select qualified observers Review the training and evaluation plan Identify the participants Plan stop points during exercises for AAR's Make potential site selections Select training aids Draft an AAR plan Review the unit's training objectives and plan RISK ASSESSMENT Risk Assessment Performed By : Risk Assessment Reviewed By : DTG : DTG : NATURE OF OPERATION OPERATION SOLDIER ALERTNESS OPERATION AREA LENGTH OF REST LEGNTH LOCAL AREA ROAD OR TACTICAL DEGREE OF HAZARD OPERATING ENVIRONMENT 72 HOURS 48 HOURS 24 HOURS 3 2 1 4 3 2

5 4 3 TACTICAL GARRISON OPTIMUM 8 HOURS PREPARATION NONTACTICAL DAY TACTICAL NIGHT TACTICAL 3 2 1 4 3 2 5 4 3 EQUIPMENT AGE HIGHLY MAINTAINED C1 C2 C3 NMC C 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 5 4 3 5 5 5 OLD

AVERAGE NEW WEATHER & ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS TIME FOR PREPARATION Review the training objectives, orders, and doctrine Observe the training Organize the selected AAR Site Collect information from the observers Develop a discussion outline Organize and rehearse CONDUCT Restate the unit's mission and event's training objectives Generate discussion Orient on training objectives Seek maximum participation Continually summarize to emphasize key learning points LEADERS TIP: If possible, write down soldier's feedback (sustain/improve) on butcher paper mounted on easel. Soldiers are more active in providing feedback if they see you care enough to write down their comments. VISIBILITY / MOISTURE TEMP. IN DEPTH ADEQUATE MINIMAL 3 2 1 4 3 2 5 4 3 < 4 HOURS 6HOURS 8HOURS 5 3 MAINTENANCE STATUS LEADERS REST AND TIME FOR PREPARATION LEADERS REST 4 2 EQUIPMENT STATUS

NATURE OF OPCON ATTACHED ORGANIC MINIMAL < 4 HOURS 3 1 FIRST LINE SUPERVISOR COMMAND CONTROL ADEQUATE 6 HOURS < 31 OR > 86 32 59 60 85 SOLDIER EXPERIENCE CLEAR/ DRY HAZE/DRIZZLE/FOG/DUST RAIN/SNOW /NIGHT 3 2 1 4 3 2 5 4 3 RISK ASSESSMENT TASK EXPERIENCED LIMITED EXPERIENCED UNTRAINED COMPLEX ROUTINE SIMPLE

3 2 1 4 3 2 5 4 3 1 LOW 11 12 CAUTION 23 24 HIGH 30 HAZARDOUS / SINSITIVE CARGO RISK ASSESSMENT MY RISK REDUCTION ACTIONS ARE 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1 LOW 9 10 CAUTION 19 20 HIGH 30 THE RISK ASSESSMENT IS High Risk Operations assigned a value of 24 30 require coordination before executing the mission, with the next higher level of command external to the element making the assessment. REMARKS CHAPTER 3 BATTLE FOCUS: OPORD MISSION STATEMENTS UNIT METL OPORD SITUATION a.

Enemy forces. Failing all else, this paragraph must answer three essential question: "What does he look like?" "What can he do to me?" "What can I do to him?". b. Friendly Forces MISSION: State at a minimum the Task and Purpose. The mission statement should explain the who, what, where, when, and why of the operation. Found in Para 3. a. 1. Maneuver in the battalion OPORD. EXECUTION Intent: Mandatory for all orders. No more than 4-5 bullet statements that address what the force must do to succeed with respect to the enemy, terrain, time and the desired end state. Intent links the mission and concept paragraph by stating key tasks which must be accomplished to accomplish the purpose of the operation (Para 2). Intent does not include method,risk or a restatement of purpose. It is not tied to a specific course of action and must be understood two levels down Intent Statement: Concept of the Operation. Reconnaissance and Surveillance. (3) Intelligence. What is the overall purpose of the intelligence collection effort? In other words, what are the most important conclusions about the enemy sought by the commander? This should parallel the commander's most important PIR which is linked to the maneuver plan. This paragraph ( and associated annexes such as R & S matrix) should focus the collection and security fight at the level of command and the order. At company and battalion level tasks, purposes, and priorities should be clearly articulated for maneuver forces assigned recon, surveillance, counter-surveillance, or counter-recon tasks - - patrol, ambushes, OP's, levels of security, etc. Tasks to Maneuver Units. Coordinating Instructions. Coordinating instructions are those which apply to two or more units. They are therefore critical to synchronization. Include purpose with each task and account for all tasks identified during mission analysis. A useful way to organize coordinating instructions so that they are easy to understand, are complete, follow a logical sequence and facilitate synchronization is to use the sequence of the attack or sequence of the defense as the framework in presenting them. The following shows how to organize subparagraphs to do this for both offense and defense order: 4. SERVICE SUPPORT 5. COMMAND AND SIGNAL a. General. Annex a. Chain of Command b. Material and Supply b. Signal (freqs and callsigns) c. Medical Evacuation and Hospitalization d. Personnel e. Civil-Military Cooperations. f. Miscellaneous. MISSION STATMENTS

MISSION STATMENTS 984TH MP CO MISSION STATEMENT TF MOUNTAIN WARRIOR MISSION STATMENT 984th MP Co conducts police mentorship In RC-East Afghanistan IOT establish security and deter the re-emergence of terrorism thereby enhancing the legitimacy and sovereignty of provincial and district governments. 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division conducts counterinsurgency operations in area of operations Mountain Warrior to defeat anti-Afghanistan forces and build the capability of the Afghan National Security Forces in order to secure the population and access to it enabling the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Government to extend and maintain its authority and influence throughout area of operations Mountain Warrior. TF SENTINEL MISSION STATEMENT Sentinel Sovereignty partners with selected AUP units in N2KL to facilitate unity of effort between joint, interagency and multinational forces, foster ANP legitimacy, and increase ANP capability to conduct independent operations to secure the population. MISSION ESSENTIAL TASK LIST MISSION ESSENTIAL TASK LIST COMPANY DMETL ASSESSMENT COLLECTIVE TASKS COMPANY ASSESSMENT Advise Host Nation Police T Supervise Security Of A Critical Site T Conduct Command And Control T Protect The Force

T Sustain The Force T SUPPORTING TASKS PLT ASSESS Advise Host Nation Police Conduct Host Nation Police Building Operations T Coordinate Intelligence Collecting And Reporting T Conduct Platoon Level Law And Order Operations T Supervise Security Of A Critical Site Conduct Critical Site Security T Supervise Convoy Security Conduct Convoy Security T Conduct Command And Control Plan An Operation T Prepare For An Operation T Execute An Operation T Protect The Force Employ Survivability Measures T Employ Cbrn Protection Measures T Sustain The Force Conduct Human Resource Support

T Conduct Logistical Support T CHAPTER 4 CHAIN OF COMMAND: CHAIN OF CONCERN CHAIN OF COMMAND NCO SUPPORT CHANNEL ALERT ROSTER QUICK REFERENCE ADDRESSES IMPORTANT NUMBERS CHAIN OF CONCERN Squad Leader Name : Address Telephone Platoon Sergeant Name : Address Telephone Platoon Leader Name : Address Telephone 1SG Name : Address Telephone Commander Address Telephone Name :

NCO SUPPORT CHANNEL CHAIN OF COMMAND REF: AR 600-20 REF: AR 600-20 SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY SMA KENNETH O. PRESTON CENTCOM SERGEANT MAJOR CSM MARVIN HILL ISAF SERGEANT MAJOR CSM MICHAEL HALL PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES BARACK H. OBAMA SECRETARY OF DEFENSE ROBERT M. GATES SECRETARY OF THE ARMY JOHN McHUGH ARMY CHIEF OF STAFF GEN GEORGE W. CASEY, JR CJTF-82 SERGEANT MAJOR CSM THOMAS CAPEL CENTCOM COMMANDER GEN DAVID PETRAEUS TF MTN WARRIOR SERGEANT MAJOR CSM CHARLES SASSER JR. ISAF COMMANDER GEN STANLEY McCRYSTAL BATTALION SERGEANT MAJOR CJTF-82 COMMANDER MG CURTIS SCAPAROTTI CSM JONATHAN NARCISSE FIRST SERGEANT 1SG EUGENE A. MARCHAND JR. PLATOON SERGEANT SFC CLEOPHUS D. GRAVES SQUAD LEADER SSG SMITH, JOE. TF MTN WARRIOR COMMANDER COL RANDY GEORGE 759TH MP BATTALION COMMANDER LTC LAURENCE LOBDELL COMPANY COMMANDER CPT EDDIE D. JONES PLATOON LEADER 1LT MARY S. FEELEY

ALERT ROSTER ALERT ROSTER QUICK REFERENCE ADDRESSES To request a copy of your OMPF, call the interactive Voice Response System (IVRS) at COM 703-325-3732 or DSN 221-3732 or fax request DSN 699-3685 COM 217-510-3685 or mail request to: Commander, USAEREC ATTN: PCRE-RF 8899 E. 56th Street Indianapolis, IN 46249-5301 NOTE: you must sign the request and include your complete SSN. To review your OMPF at USAEREC call: Commercial: (317)-510-3361/3735 DSN 699-3361/3735, three to five days advance notice is required. To update your OMPF have your PSC forward documents to: Commander, USAEREC ATTN: PCRE-FS 8899 E. 56th Street Indianapolis, IN 46249-5301 IMPORTANT NUMBERS Inquiries about receipt and date of your NCO-ER, photograph, PQR or Letter to Board President call: Fire 911 or Commercial (703) 325-3732 DSN 221-3732 Police 991 or Medical Ambulance 911 or Army Community Service To request transfer of an Article 15 from the performance fiche to the restricted fiche of the OMPF (procedures in AR 27-10): DA Suitability Evaluation Board ATTN: DAPE-MPC-E Hoffman Building 200 Stovall Street Alexandria, VA 22332-2600 Army Emergency Relief Red Cross ADAPCP Equal Opportunity Office Hospital Appointments

Unit CORRESPONDENCE TO BOARD PRESIDENT Troop Medical Clinic ADDRESS ALL MEMORANDUMS Spouse Work President, (SFC or MSG or SGM) Selection Board c/o Commander, U.S. Army Enlisted Records and Evaluation Center, ATTN: PCRE-BA, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46249-5301 Baby Sitter Two copies of your photograph should be mailed to: Golf Course High School Elementary School Commander, USAEREC ATTN: PCRE-BA 8899 E. 56th Street Indianapolis, IN 46249-5301 Youth Services Education Center Community Center NOTE: DO NOT SEND PHOTO TO PERSCOM Dental Clinic Chaplain/Pastor/Clergy Bowling Alley Elk Horn NOTE: COMPLETE SSN REQUIRED CHAPTER 5 EQUIPMENT DATA WEAPONS AND MASK INVENTORY SENSITIVE ITEMS LIST VEHICLE STATUS

COMMUNICATION STATUS WEAPONS STATUS WEAPONS AND MASK INVENTORY Name Weapon S/N Mask # SENSITIVE ITEMS ITEM WEAPON # SERIAL # SENSITIVE ITEMS SIGNED TO ITEM WEAPON # SERIAL # SIGNED TO COMMUNICATION STATUS VEHICLE STATUS BUMPER STATUS ISSUES SERVICE DATE S/N NOM STATUS ISSUES SERVICE DATE

WEAPONS STATUS WEAPONS STATUS Rack # Status Deficiencies Service Date Rack # Status Deficiencies Service Date CHAPTER 5 ARMY VALUES LDRSHIP REFERENCES ARMY VALUES NBC 1 REPORT SOLDIERS CREED EVALUATE A CASUALTY CREED OF THE NCO 9 LINE MEDEVAC CODE OF CONDUCT

NCO VISION 31B PROFESSIONAL DEV MODEL ARMY SONG BN CREST BN HISTORY PROMOTION CRITERIA LDR REQUIREMENTS MODEL CO LINEAGE AND HONORS SEPARATION GUIDANCE LEADERS DUTIES MIRANDA RIGHTS UXO REPORT SALUTE REPORT CALL FOR FIRE PUNITIVE ARTICLES

L- LOYALTY: BEAR TRUE FAITH AND ALLEGIANCE TO THE U.S. CONSTITUTION, THE ARMY, AND OTHER SOLDIERS. D- DUTY: FULFILL YOUR OBLIGATIONS. R- RESPECT: TREAT PEOPLE AS THEY SHOULD BE TREATED. S- SELFLESS-SERVICE: PUT THE WELFARE OF THE NATION, THE ARMY AND YOUR SUBORDINATES BEFORE YOUR OWN. H- HONOR: LIVE UP TO ALL THE ARMY VALUES. I- INTEGRETY: DO WHATS RIGHT, LEGALLY AND MORALLY. P- PERSONAL COURAGE: FACE FEAR, DANGER, OR ADVERSITY (PHYSICAL AND MORAL). SOLDIERS CREED I am an American Soldier. I am a Warrior and a member of a team. I serve the people of the United States and live the Army Values. I will always place the mission first. I will never accept defeat. WARRIOR ETHOS I will never quit. I will never leave a fallen comrade. I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained and proficient in my warrior tasks and drills. I always maintain my arms, my equipment and myself. I am an expert and I am a professional. I stand ready to deploy, engage, and destroy the enemies of the United States of America in close combat. I am a guardian of freedom and the American way of life. I am an American Soldier. CREED OF THE NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICER No one is more professional than I. I am a Noncommissioned Officer, a leader of soldiers. As a Noncommissioned Officer, I realize that I am a member of a time honored corps, which is known as "The Backbone of the Army". I am proud of the Corps of Noncommissioned Officers and will at all times conduct myself so as to bring credit upon the Corps, the Military Service and my country regardless of the situation in which I find myself. I will not use my grade or position to attain pleasure, profit, or personal safety. Competence is my watchword. My two basic responsibilities will always be uppermost in my mind -- accomplishment of my mission and the welfare of my soldiers. I will strive to remain technically and tactically proficient. I am aware of my role as a Noncommissioned

Officer. I will fulfill my responsibilities inherent in that role. All soldiers are entitled to outstanding leadership; I will provide that leadership. I know my soldiers and I will always place their needs above my own. I will communicate consistently with my soldiers and never leave them uninformed. I will be fair and impartial when recommending both rewards and punishment. Officers of my unit will have maximum time to accomplish their duties; they will not have to accomplish mine. I will earn their respect and confidence as well as that of my soldiers. I will be loyal to those with whom I serve; seniors, peers, and subordinates alike. I will exercise initiative by taking appropriate action in the absence of orders. I will not compromise my integrity, nor my moral courage. I will not forget, nor will I allow my comrades to forget that we are professionals, Noncommissioned Officers, leaders! CODE OF CONDUCT 1. I am an American, fighting in the forces which guard my country and our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their defense. 2. I will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I will never surrender the members of my command while they have the means to resist. 3. If I am captured, I will continue to resist by all means available. I will make every effort to escape and aid others to escape. I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy. 4. If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners. I will give no information or take part in any action which might be harmful to my comrades. If I am senior, I will take command. If not I will obey the lawful orders of those appointed over me and will back them up in every way. 5. When questioned, should I become a prisoner of war, I am required to give only my name, rank, service number and date of birth. I will evade answering further questions to the utmost of my ability. I will make no oral or written statement disloyal to my country and its allies or harmful to their cause. 6. I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my GOD and in the United States of America. NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICER CHARGE I will discharge carefully and diligently the duties of the grade to which I have been promoted and uphold the traditions and standards of the Army. I understand that soldiers of lesser rank are required to obey my lawful orders. Accordingly, I accept responsibility for their actions. As a noncommissioned officer, I accept the charge to observe and follow the orders and directions given by supervisors acting according to the laws, articles and rules governing the discipline of the Army, I will correct conditions detrimental to the readiness thereof. In so doing, I will fulfill my greatest

obligation as a leader and thereby confirm my status as a noncommissioned officer. NCO VISION An NCO Corp grounded in heritage, values and traditions, that embodies the warrior Ethos; values perpetual learning; and is capable of leading, training, and motivating Soldiers. We must always be a Corps that: Lead by Example Train from Experience Maintains and Enforces Standard Takes Care of Soldiers Adapts to a Changing World Jack L. Tilley 12th Sergeant Major of the Army THE ARMY SONG First to fight for the right, And to build the Nations might, And The Army Goes Rolling Along. Proud of all we have done, Fighting till the battles won, And the Army Goes Rolling Along. Then its hi! hi! hey! The Armys on its way. Count off the cadence loud and strong; For whereer we go, You will always know That The Army Goes Rolling Along. MILITARY POLICE REGIMENTAL MARCH We are the Regiment, That of the troops was born. We are the Regiment, That for the troops was formed. Military Police Corps In peace and war is there To assist, protect, defend our own No matter when or where. 759TH MP BN CREST Colors: emerald green and golden yellow represent the Military Police Corps. Silver (the color of the two columns of the airlift monument) represents inspiration. Upper Triangle with Fleurs-de-Lis: represents Battalion combat participation in Naples- Foggia (January to May 1944), Rome-Arno (June to August 1944), Southern France amphibious

landing at San Raphael, August 1944. Lower Triangle with Fleurs-de-Lis: represent the campaign in Rhineland(August to September 1944), Central Europe (October to November 1944), The Ardennes- Alsace region (the Bastogne) (December 1944 to January 1945). Palm Tree: represents service in North Africa. Its branches symbolize victory, superiority, and triumph. Airlift Bearing: copied from the airlift memorial built at Tempelhof Plaza. The bearing was awarded to the Battalion for their over and beyond service during the Soviet blockade of Berlin in 1948-1949. The two columns in the three pronged concrete monument symbolize the two major runways, used by C-47s and C-54s flying cargo into Tempelhof Airbase. The three projecting ends point to the three major airports: Frankfurt, Munich, and Hamburg from where West Berlin was supplied. Background: The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 2 Oct 1952. 759TH MP BN HISTORY The 759th Military Police Battalion was constituted 19 August 1942 in the Army of the United States and activated 15 September 1942 at Fort Ontario, New York. The cadre was comprised of four officers and one hundred and seven enlisted Soldiers from the 712th Military Police Battalion and three officers from the Provost Marshal General School at Fort Ogelthorpe, Georgia. The battalion remained at Fort Ontario undergoing training until March 1943 when it moved to New York City and was engaged in dock security. In April, the battalion moved to Fort Dix, New Jersey, where it underwent intensive training and acted as escort for prisoners of war trains. The end of July found the battalion enroute to Camp Patrick Henry, VA. Here the battalion was organized into prisoner of war teams of one officer and thirty two enlisted Soldiers, and by late August, all were overseas in Oran, Algeria except a skeleton headquarters of five officers and sixteen enlisted Soldiers. In Algeria, MPs were assigned to patrol Oran and the villages nearby, handle traffic control for trucks moving in and out of the port, and guarding supply facilities and POW collection points that were scattered all the way to Bizerte, Algeria. Late October 1943, two prisoner of war teams returned and the rear detachment moved to Fort Dix, NJ and prepared for the expected return of the rest of the prisoner of war teams. However, the remainder of the battalion deployed December 15, 1943 to Oran, Algeria. On December 28,1943, the battalion sailed for Naples, Italy for duty with the 5th Army where it was billeted in the stables of the Kings Palace. The battalion moved after the 5th Army through Capua and Sessa and on June 10, 1944, they participated in General Clarks Grand Parade through the streets of Rome. Continuing with the 5th Army, performing traffic control and general security missions, the battalion moved on through Rome to Siena. Here on July 19, orders were received for the battalion to return to Naples. Duty with the 5th Army was completed and the battalion was assigned to the 7th Army for the impending invasion of Southern France. On July 21, the battalion was in bivouac below Anzio and the next morning the companies left for their respective assignments, each being assigned to provide security and traffic control on the various landing beaches. The successful landing was made with only two fatalities, PFC Ralph C. Carter, and PFC Pasquale A. Sergio, both of Company B, 759th MP Battalion. In October 1944, the 36th Infantry along with the 759th MP Battalion rushed northward towards the Ardennes, to link with General Bradleys 12th Army Group. The battalion was stationed just south of Bastogne to provide traffic control for General Pattons supply vehicles as they prepared for the upcoming battle. On January, 1 1945, 759TH MP BN HISTORY (CONTINUED) German soldiers dressed in American uniforms and speaking english attempted to infiltrate American lines. Military Police from the 759th help thwart this attempt and their alertness helped allow General Bradleys armada to

breakthrough enemy lines. From the Ardennes, the 759th Military Police Battalion moved towards the Rhine River with General Pattons Third and General Patchs Seventh Armies. The MPs were spread throughout several locations including Mannheim, Heidelberg, and Phorzeim, ahead of the infantry, setting up patrols and directing traffic. VE Day found the battalion in possession of five Battle stars for the campaigns in Italy (Naples-Foggia, Rome-Arno), Southern France (with arrowhead), Rhineland, and Central Europe. From VE Day until early October 1945, the battalion engaged in reorganization and training, a large portion of the battalion attending MP School at Bar-Le-Duc, France. During this period there were many personnel changes in the battalion, as high point Soldiers left for the States and were replaced by low point Soldiers. The battalion was tentatively scheduled for duty in the Pacific theater, then for re-deployment, but finally in mid October 1945 the 759th MP Battalion was chosen for what was considered the prize assignment of the occupation, relocation to the city of Berlin. The Battalion coined the phrase Law East of the Elbe, that lasted until the US occupation ended in 1989 after the collapse of the Berlin Wall. By the end of October 1945, the move to Berlin was completed and the 759th Military Police Battalion relieved the 713th Military Police Battalion of duty. Headquarters, A, and C Companies were billeted at 86-89 Kaiserallee, B Company at 10 Geygerstrasse and D Company at 10 Scharfestrasse. Companies A, B, and D were the patrol companies and Company C the service company, furnishing all escorts, the interior guard for the Command Post and maintaining the Motor Pool at Kaiserallee. In April 1947, the battalion moved to Roosevelt Barracks. The four line companies were assigned patrol areas and HQ Company personnel assumed responsibility for escorts, special details and operation of the Military Police District Headquarters. One of the initial duties assigned to the battalion was the training and equipping of a cadre of German police. The battalion kitchens also fed the local populace and organized German American Youth Clubs. On October 20, 1947, the 759th Military Police Battalion was re-designated the 759th Military Police Service Battalion. In 1948, the battalion assisted in the Berlin Airlift during the Soviet blockade of the city. The Battalion served so well during the blockade of the city, that the memorial Luftbrucke which was subsequently built to commemorate the event is included on the Distinctive Unit Insignia of the 759th Military Police Battalion. 759TH MP BN HISTORY (CONTINUED) August 1949, the 513th Military Police Service Platoon and the 18th Military Police Service Platoon was formed as a provisional company and designated Company E with duties of interior guard of the Berlin Military Police Headquarters Compound. In March 1950, the battalion prepared to move from Roosevelt Barracks to McNair Barracks in the city of Berlin. A Company made the initial move on March 29, 1950. The movement of the entire battalion was not completed until June 11, 1950. At that time all company messes were abolished and a Battalion Consolidated Mess, which had been partially operating since April 28, 1950, was officially established. The Battalion Motor Pool was established in Andrews Barracks and remained the motorpool for the Military Police until the inactivation of Berlin Brigade. Early in March 1950, the battalion was relieved of some of its military police commitments by Company C, 382nd Military Police Service Battalion, stationed in Bremerhaven, Germany, the 526th Military Police Service Company, stationed in Hanau, Germany and the 511th Military Police Service Platoon, stationed in Mannheim, Germany. These organizations, augmented by the 513th and 18th Military Police Service Platoons, assumed the military police functions of Berlin Military Post, and the battalion went into intensive tactical training. On June 1, 1950, the battalion resumed its police duties in Berlin. On November 20, 1950, the 18th and 513th Military Police Service Platoons were inactivated and the 759th Military Police Service Battalion was redesignated the 759th Military Police Battalion under TO&E 19-55, 19-56, 19-57, less Company D. On November 24, 1950, the Horse Platoon, previously attached to the 16th Constabulary Squadron was deactivated and personnel and all equipment

were transferred to the 759th Military Police Battalion. The personnel remained intact as a Provisional Horse Platoon with authorization for one officer, thirty-seven Soldiers and fifty-two horses. In addition to the battalions primary military function of policing Berlin, it also operated the Post Provisional Guardhouse, and two checkpoints on the corridor through the Soviet Zone. One checkpoint was located at the Hemelin Bridge (Check Point Bravo) in Berlin and the other was at Helmstedt, Germany (Check Point Alpha-within the British Sector of Northern Germany). A Highway Patrol Section with three patrol sedans patrolled the corridor from Berlin to Helmstedt. The battalion was inactivated on November 2, 1953 in Berlin, Germany. 759TH MP BN HISTORY (CONTINUED) The Battalion was activated again on June 6, 1968 at Fort Dix, New Jersey and reorganized on November 2, 1970. At the time, the battalion consisted of HHD, the 412th Military Police Company, 511th Military Police Company and the 555th Military Police Company. The primary missions of the battalion included law enforcement, support Fort Dix Oplans as directed by the Commanding General, and provide operational support to the U.S. Army Training Center at Fort Dix as directed by the Commanding General. The Battalion supported Cuban resettlement operations in 1980 and 1981 at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin. By 1984, the composition of the Battalion had changed and consisted of HHD, 511th MP Company, D/39th ENG, 363rd Trans Company, and the 556th MED Company. The 759th Military Police Battalion was relocated to Fort Carson, Colorado in 1987. The 984th MP Company came under control of the battalion upon arrival to Ft. Carson. D Company 39th Engineer Battalion remained at Fort Dix. From August 6, 1990 to December 4, 1990, HHD and the 984th MP Company deployed to Panama in support of Operation Promote Liberty. Their mission was to protect U.S. citizens, U.S. property, and U.S. interests in support of the nation building process. In 1991, the Battalion deployed in support of Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The battalion was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation and Streamer embroidered SOUTHWEST ASIA. From Sep 9, 1994 to Jan 23, 1995, HHD and the 59th MP Company deployed to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Their mission was to provide humanitarian and civil affairs operations in support of Cuban and Haitian migrant camps. For their efforts, the battalion was awarded the Joint Meritorious Unit Award and Streamer embroidered GUANTANAMO BAY. In 1999, the 759th MP Battalion was awarded the Superior Unit Citation for distinguishing itself by deploying and redeploying subordinate units and individual soldiers in support of two major contingency operations, three major training exercises, and numerous Secretary of Defense and United States Army Forces Command support missions, while simultaneously providing force protection and law enforcement support of the Fort Carson community. Following September 11, 2001, the battalion deployed to the Military District of Washington in support of Operation Noble Eagle. 759TH MP BN HISTORY (CONTINUED) There they provided security to the Pentagon. In January 2004, the Battalion deployed to Baghdad, Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom II. Upon arrival into theater, the battalion was put in charge of numerous Iraqi Police stations on the east side of the Tigris River. The augmented battalion consisted of HHD, the 984th MP Company, the 630th MP Company, the 571st MP Company, the 272nd MP Company, the 415th MP Det (USAR), G Company (1-258 FA) and C Company ( 3-112 FA). Soldiers provided training to the Iraqi Police in areas of force protection, patrolling, and station operation. In April 2004, the 984th Military Police Company closed down the Al-Hawza newspaper station that belonged to Al-Sadir for printing anti-coalition propaganda. As a result of that operation, Sadirs military force began attacking Iraqi Police Stations. Soldiers from the battalion began manning these stations 24 hours a day in effort to repel these attacks. By June 2004, most of the companies in the battalion were out of police stations and began conducting area security operation throughout the city. In October

2004, the battalion jumped TOC to the Abu Ghraib Prison to support the Marines and First Cavalry Division in Fallujah. Soldiers from the 984th MP Company and 630th MP Company provided security to the major access roads into Fallujah, allowing freedom of movement for coalition forces. Here, several Soldiers were awarded Purple Hearts for wounds received on patrol. The battalion redeployed in January/ February 2005 and was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation. Currently, the 759th Military Police Battalion consists of HHD, the 148th Military Police Detachment, the 59th Military Police Company, 110th Military Police Company, 127 th Military Police Company, and the 984th Military Police Company. 984TH MP CO (IMMORTALS) LINEAGE AND HONORS Constituted 14 Jul 1942 in the Army of the United States as the 984th Military Police Company Activated 1 Aug 1942 ant Camp Riley, Minnesota Reorganized as redesignated 10 August 1945 as the 984th Military Police Company, Aviation Inactivated 1 December 1945 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey Redesignated 29 December 1966 as the 984th Military Police Company and allotted to the Regular Army Activated 25 February 1967 at Fort Carson, Colorado CAMPAIGN PARTICIPATION CREDIT World War II European-African-MIDDLE Eastern Theater, Streamer without inscription Southwest Asia Defense of Saudi Arabia Liberation and defense of Kuwait Cease-Fire, DECORATIONS Army Superior Unit Award, Streamer embroidered 1996-1997 Meritorious Unit Commendation 30 January 2004 10 December 2004 Meritorious Unit Commendation 14 September 2006 29 October 2007 FIRST SERGEANT DUTIES When you are talking about the First Sergeant, you are talking about the lifeblood of the Army. There can be no substitute for this position or any questions of its importance. When First Sergeants are exceptional, their units are exceptional, regardless of any other single personality involved. Perhaps their ranks insignia should be the keystone rather than the traditional one depicted here. It is the position of first sergeant in which almost all unit operations merge. The First Sergeant holds formations, instructs Platoon Sergeants and assists the commander in training all enlisted members. The First Sergeants is proud of the unit and, understandably, wants others to be aware of the unit's success. For the first time, the title of address for this grade is not sergeant. "first sergeant." There is a unique relationship of confidence and respect that exists between the first sergeant and the commander not found at Another level within the Army. The Master Sergeant serves as the principal NCO in staff elements at battalion and higher levels. Although not charged with the enormous leadership responsibilities of the First Sergeant, the Master Sergeant is expected to dispatch

leadership and other duties with the same professionalism and to achieve the same results as the First Sergeant. SERGEANT FIRST CLASS DUTIES The Platoon Sergeant is considered key in the command structure of the Army. Platoon Sergeants generally have several staff sergeants working under their leadership. The Platoon Sergeant is the key assistant and advisor to the Platoon Leader. In the absence of the Platoon Leader, the platoon Sergeant commands the platoon. The Sergeant First Class may serve in a position subordinates to the Platoon Sergeant or may serve as the NCOIC of a section with all the attendants responsibilities and duties of the Platoon Sergeant. Whether Platoon Sergeant or Sergeant First Class, this is the first level at which the term senior NCO property applies. The Platoon Sergeant or Sergeant First Class generally has 15 to 18 years or more of military experience and is rightfully expected to bring that experience to bear in quick, accurate decisions that are in the best interest of the mission and the soldier. The Platoon Sergeant is expected to embody all the traits of a leader. STAFF SERGEANT DUTIES The rank of Staff Sergeant closely parallels that of the Sergeant in duties and responsibilities. In fact, the basic duties and responsibilities of all the NCO ranks never change, but there are significant difference between this step in the NCO structure and the preceding one. The Staff Sergeant is a more experienced leader of soldiers. It is proper to expect that the Staff Sergeant can bring the benefits of that experience to bear in any situation and under all circumstances. The major difference between the Staff Sergeant and the Sergeant is not authority, as is often mistakenly believed, but rather sphere of influence. The Staff Sergeant is in daily contact with large numbers of soldiers and generally has more equipment and other property to maintain. Staff Sergeants often have one or more Sergeants working under their leadership. Staff sergeants are responsible for their continued successful development as well as that of other soldiers in the section, squad or team. If NCOs are "the backbone" of the Army, then Staff Sergeants are the elements of which backbones are made. The complexities of the Staff Sergeant's job increases as the responsibilities broaden. The Staff Sergeant's success, more than any other grade of the NCO rank, leads to the Army's success, and the footprints you see behind those of our greatest military leaders are probably those of Staff Sergeants, where they stood confident, proud and eager to assist. SERGEANT DUTIES Of all the NCO ranks, this one, very possibly, has the

greatest impact on lower-ranking soldiers. Privates, who are the basic manpower strength of the Army, generally have Sergeants as their first NCO leaders. It is to the rank of Sergeant that the privates look for example. Sergeants are responsible for the individual training, personal appearance and cleanliness of their Soldiers. The authority of the Sergeant is equal to that of any other NCO rank. The Sergeant must be unquestionably competent in order to carry out the mission correctly, accomplish each task and care for assigned Soldiers. The rank of Sergeant is not a position in which to learn how to become a leader - no apprenticeship here. While certainly the new Sergeant will be developed new skills, strengthening old ones and generally better, he or she is a Sergeant, and is no less a professional than those grades of rank to come. CORPORALS DUTIES The Corporal was established in 1775 with the birth of the Army and the NCO corps. Along with the rank of Sergeant, the Corporal is the only rank that has never disappeared from the NCO corps. The Corporal is the base of the NCO ranks, serving as leader of the smallest Army units, principally; teams leaders. Like Sergeants, Corporals are responsible for the individual training, personal appearance and cleanliness of their Soldiers. As the Command Sergeant major is known as the epitome of success in the NCO corps, the Corporal is the beginning of the NCO corps. As the NCO corps is known as the backbone of the Army, the Corporal is the backbone of the NCO corps. No one is more professional than I. IED / UXO Report LIN E ITEM 1 DGT: 2 GRID: 3 METHOD: 4 TYPE:

5 NBC: 6 THREAT: 7 IMPACT: 8 PROTECTIVE MEASURE: 9 PRIORITY: SPOT REPORT / SALUTE LINE ITEM 1 Size: 2 Activity: 3 Location: 4 Unit / Uniform: 5 Time Observed: 6 Equipment: NOTES: CALL FOR FIRE DESCRIPTION (Steps 1-3 are Required) STEP 1 Size:

2 Activity: 3 Location: 4 Unit / Uniform: 5 Time Observed: 6 NOTES: Equipment: NBC 1 REPORT LINE ITEM *CHEM/BIO B Position of Observer (UTM Coord): C Direction of Attack from Observer (Degrees) (Mils): D Date-Time Group of Detonation / *Area Attacked (DTC): F Location of Attack / *Area Attacked (Actual) (Estimated) (UTM Coord): G Means of Delivery (Artillery, Mortar, Spray, Etc.): H Height of Burst / *Type of Agent (Air) (Surface) (Unknown): NBC 4 REPORT H Height of Burst / *Type of Agent (Air) (Surface) (Unknown): Q Location of (UTM Coord) (Air) (Liquid):

R Dose Rate Measure in Open, 1 Meter Above the Ground (cGy/hr): S DTG of Initial : NOTES: 9 LINE MEDICAL EVACULATION REQUEST Air/Ground 1 Grid Location of Pickup Site:____________________________ 2 Radio Frequency, Call Sign: ____________________________ EVALUATE A CASUALTY / FIRST AID STEP ACTION Number of Patients by Precedence: A. _____ Urgent B. _____ Urgent-Surgical 3 C. _____ Priority D. _____ Routine E. _____ Convenience 1 Airway - Clear and Maintain: 2 Bleeding - Stop: 3 Cover and Protect Wound: 4 Prevent or Treat Shock: 5 Check for Fractures, Burns, Concussions: 6 Avoid Moving Suspected Neck or Back Injuries: Security of Picup Site (Wartime): ________________________ 6 N - No Enemy P - Possible Enemy E - Enemy Troops in Area X - Enemy Troops - Escort Required 7

Do Not Give Water to Abdominal Wound Except to Moisten Lips: 6 8 Seek Medical Aid: NOTES: Special Equipment: ___________________________________ 4 A. None B. Hoist C. Extraction Equipment D. Ventilator 5 Number of Patients by Type: L _____ # Patients Liter A _____ # Patients Ambulatory (Peacetime) Number and Type of Wound, Injury. Specific Information Regarding Casualty(ies): ______________________ Method of Marking: ____________________________________ A. Panels B. Pyrotechnic Signal 7 C. Smoke Signal D. None E. Other 8 Patient Nationality and Status: __________________________ A. Military B. Civilian C. Non-U.S. Military D. Non-U.S. Civilian E. Enemy Prisoner of War (EPW) 9 NBC / Terrain Description (Wartime): _____________________ N. Nuclear B. Biological C. Chemical 9 (Peacetime) Detailed Terrain Feature Description PROMOTION CRITERIA MILITARY POLICE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT MODEL RANK WITH WAIVER WITHOUT WAIVER

E-1 TO E-2 4-6 MONTHS TIS 6 MONTHS TIS E-2 TO E-3 6-12 MONTHS TIS 2 MONTHS TIG 12 MONTHS TIS E-3 TO E-4 18 MONTHS TIS 3 MONTHS TIG 26 MONTHS TIS 6 MONTHS TIG RANK SECONDARY ZONE PRIMARY ZONE E-4 TO E-5 16 MONTHS TIS 4 MONTHS TIG 34 MONTHS TIS 8 MONTHS TIG E-5 TO E-6 16 MONTHS TIS 5 MONTHS TIG 82 MONTHS TIS 10 MONTHS TIG FACTOR 1. MOS 2. Education. 3. Time requirement for board appearance as of the first day of the board month. 4. Reenlistment eligibility. 5. Physical qualifications. 6. APFT 7. Weight control.

8. ADAPCP 9. Total promotion points after board appearance. 10. Disciplinary CRITERIA Soldier must be recommended in CPMOS. Must be fully qualified in recommended MOS. CIVILIAN: Must have high school diploma, GED, or an associates or higher degree. MILITARY: Must complete the active component resident PLDC prior to board appearance to SSG. SSG. 82 months TIS and 10 months TIG. SGT. 34 months TIS and eight months TIG. Must not be ineligible to reenlist in accordance with applicable regulation. Considered physically qualified unless undergoing medical evaluation (MMRB, MEB, PEB) to determine qualifications for continued active service. Must possess a current passing APFT score in accordance with applicable regulations and field manuals. Cannot be enrolled in the program. Cannot be enrolled in the program. WAIVER(S) None. None. Resident BNCOC and PLDC graduates. Constructive credit granted by TRADOC. Nonresident courses do quality for this requirement. 46 months TIS and five months TIG for those who have been recommended to compete in the secondary zone. 16 months TIS and four months TIG for those who have been recommended to compete in the secondary zone. None. None. None. None. None. For SSG minimum of 450 points. For SGT minimum of 350 points.

None. Not be flagged in accordance with AR 600-8-2 None. LEADERSHIP REQUIREMENTS MODEL LEADERSHIP REQUIREMENTS MODEL Leads Others Attributes What an Army Leader Is A Leader of Character Army Values Empathy Warrior Ethos A Leader with Presence Military Bearing Physically fit Composed, confident A Leader with Intellectual Capacity Mental Agility Sound Judgment Innovation Interpersonal tact Domain knowledge Core Leader Competencies What an Army Leader Does Leads Leads Other Extends influence beyond the chain of command Leads by example Communicates Leads Provides purpose, motivation, insight. Enforces Standards. Balances mission and welfare of Soldiers.

Creates a Positive Environment Develops Creates a positive environment Prepares self Develops others Develops Achieves Gets results Extends influence beyond the chain of command Build trust outside lines of authority Understands sphere, means, and limits of influence. Negotiate, build consensus, resolves conflict. Leads by example Displays character Listens actively Lead with confidence in adverse conditions. States goals for action. Ensure sheared understanding. Demonstrates competence. Prepares Self Develops Leaders Set the conditions for positive

climate Be prepared for expected and unexpected challenges. Assess developmental needs. Develop on the job Build teamwork Expand Knowledge Encourage imitative Maintain selfawareness. Demonstrate care for people Support professional and personal growth. Help people learn. Counsel, coach, mentor. Build team skills and process Gets Results Provide direction, guidance, and priorities. Achieves Communication Develop and execute plans. Accomplish tasks consistently. GUIDELINES FOR INVOLUNTARY SEPARATION IAW AR 635-200 Chapter 5-8, Involuntary Separation due to Parenthood: Paragraph 1-18 counseling, Family Care Packet indicating SMs inability to provide a Short/Long term care provider. Separation authority: Bde Cdr. Honorable or General Discharge if SM had FG Article 15s or Specific reason to warrant so. Mandatory IRR transfer. Chapter 5-13: Personality Disorder: Paragraph 1-18 counseling, physical and mental status evaluation by psychiatrist or clinical psychologist. Honorable; General Discharge if convicted by GCM or two SPCM during current enlistment. Separation authority: Bde Cdr. No IRR. Chapter 5-18, Other Physical or mental Conditions: Paragraph 1-18 counseling, physical exam, mental status evaluation by psychiatrist or clinical psychologist. Approving authority: Bn Cdr if<6 yrs. Honorable; General if convicted by GCM or two SPCMs during current enlistment. No IRR transfer. Chapter 9, Alcohol/Drug Abuse Rehabilitation Failure: Memo from ADAPCP as been a rehab. Failure, Chain of Custody/CID Report, physical and mental evaluations. Approving authority: Bn

Cdr if<6 yrs. Honorable; General, if specific factors warrant so. No IRR transfer. Chapter 13, Unsatistactory Performance: Paragraph 1-18 counseling, all performance counseling forms, PT scorecard, physical and mental evaluations. Approving authority: Bn Cdr, if<6 yrs. , Bde Cdr if>6 yrs. Honorable or General Discharge. Mandatory IRR Transfer. GUIDELINES FOR INVOLUNTARY SEPARATION IAW AR 635-200 Chapter 14, Misconduct: Supporting document, Article 15s or MP/CID reports, physical and mental evaluations, Separation authority: Bde Cdr, if Honorable/General Discharge, CG if OTH is to be issued with board approval. Chapter 14-12a or 14-12b, parpagraph 1-18 counseling is mandatory. Chapter 14-12c: Commission of a Serious Offense: First time drug offenders, in the rank of SGT and above, and soldiers with over 3 years of service on current enlistment, separation must be initiated, regardless of chain of command recommendation to retain or separate SM. No IRR transfer. Chapter 15, Homosexuality: Dont ask, Dont tell policy!!! MPI/CID report, physical and mental evaluations, Separation authority: if Honorable/General Discharge, Bde Cdr, CG if OTH is recommended by board findings. No IRR transfer. Chapter 18: Failure to Meet Body Composition/Weight Control Standards: Paragraph 1-18 counseling, monthly weigh-in sheets, memorandum of enrollment in Weight Control Program, request to medical personnel for physical evaluation and reponse, medical exam and Nutritional Counseling. Approving authority: if<6 yrs, Bn Cdr, >6 yrs. Separation authority: Bde Cdr, Honorable Discharge. Mandatory IRR transfer. IRR Transfer: SM with < three months remaining statutory obiligation, will not be transferd to the Individual Ready Reserves. Statutory Obiligation is up to 8 yrs. After IAT completion. DA Froms 2A and 2-1 are needed for all chapter packet requests. NOTE: MILPO will also need transportation and educational counseling to cut orders. MIRANDA RIGHTS BLANK RIGHT WARNING STATEMENT VERBAL RIGHTS WARNING Inform the person of your official position, the nature of the offense(s), and the fact that he/she is suspect/accused. Then read him/her the following do not paraphrase; read verbatim: `BEFORE I ASK YOU ANY QUESTIONS, YOU MUST UNDERSTAND YOUR RIGHT. 1.YOU DO NOT HAVE TO ANSWER MY QUESTIONS OR SAY ANYTHING. 2. ANYTHING YOU SAY OR DO CAN BE USED AS EVIDENCE AGAINST YOU IN A CRIMINAL TRAIL. 3. (for personnel subject to the UCMJ) YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO TALK PRIVATELY TO A LAWYER BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER QUESTIONING AND TO HAVE A LAWYER PRESENT WITH YOU DURING QUESTIONING. THIS LAWYER CAN BE A CIVILIAN YOU ARRANGE FOR AT NO EXPENSE TO THE GOVERNMENT OR A MILITARY LAWYER DETAILED FOR YOU AT NO EXPENSE TO YOU OR BOTH. (for civilian not subject to the UCMJ) YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO TALK PRIVATELY TO A LAWYER BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER

QUESTIONING AND TO HAVE A LAWYER PRESENT WITH YOU DURING QUESTIONING. THIS LAWYER CAN BE ONE YOU ARRANGE FOR AT YOUR OWN EXPENSE, OR IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD A LAWYER AND WANT ONE, A LAWYER WILL BE APPOINTED FOR YOU BEFORE ANY QUESTIONING BEGINS. 4. IF YOU ARE NOW WILLING TO DISCUSS THE OFFENSE(S) UNDER INVESTIGATION, WITH OR WITHOUT A LAWYER PRESENT, YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO STOP ANSWERING QUESTIONS AT ANY TIME, OR SPEAK PRIVATELY WITH A LAWYER BEFORE ANSWERING FURTHER, EVEN IF YOU SIGN A WAIVER CERTIFICATE. MIRANDA RIGHTS BLANK RIGHT WARNING STATEMENT Make certain the suspect/accused fully understands his/her rights. then say: DO YOU WANT A LAWYER AT THIS TIME? AT THIS TIME, ARE YOU WILLING TO DISCUSS THE OFFENSE(S) UNDER INVESTIGATION AND MAKE A STATEMENT WITHOUT TALKING TO A LAWYER AND WITHOUT HAVING A LAWYER PRESENT WITH YOU? PUNITIVE ARTICLES UCMJ Article 77- Principals Article 78-Accessory after the fact Article 79-Conviction of lesser-included offenses Article 80-Attempts Article 81-Conspiracy Article 82-Solicitation Article 83-Fraudulent enlistment, appointment, or separation Article 84-Effecting unlawful enlistment, appointment, or separation Article 85-Desertion Article 86-Absence without leave Article 87-Missing movement Article 88-Contempt toward officials Article 89-Disrespect toward a superior commissioned officer Article 90-Assaulting or willfully disobeying superior commissioned officer Article 91-Insubordinate conduct toward warrant officer, noncommissioned officer, or petty officer Article 92-Failure to obey order or regulation Article 93-Cruelty and maltreatment Article 94-Mutiny and sedation Article 95-Resistance, Flight, breach of arrest, and escape Article 96-Releasing prisoner without proper authority Article 97-Unlawful detention Article 98-Noncompliance with procedural rules Article 99-Misbehavior before the enemy Article 100-Subordinate compelling surrender Article 101-Improper use of countersign Article 102-Forcing a safeguard Article 103-Captured or abandoned property Article 104-Aiding the enemy Article 105-Misconduct as a prisoner Article 106-Spies Article 106a-Espionage Article 107-False official statements Article 108-Military property of the United States-sale, loss, damage, destruction, or wrongful disposition Article 109-Property other than military property of the United States-waste, spoilage, or destruction

Article 110-Improper hazarding of vessel Article 111-Drunken or reckless operation of vehicle, aircraft, or vessel Article 112-Drunk on duty Article 112a-Wrongful use, possession, etc., of controlled substances Article 113-Misbehaving of sentinel or lookout Article 114-Dueling Article 115-Malingering PUNITIVE ARTICLES UCMJ Article 116-Riot or breach of peace Article 117-Provoking speeches or gestures Article 118-Murder Article 119-Manslaughter Article 120-Rape and carnal knowledge Article 121-Larceny and wrongful appropriation Article 122-Robbery Article 123-Forgery Article 123a-Making, Drawing, or uttering check, draft, or order without sufficient funds Article 124-Maiming Article 125-Sodomy Article 126-Arson Article 127-Extortion Article 128-Assault Article 129-Buglary Article 130-Housbreaking Article 131-Perjury Article 132-Frauds against the United States Article 133-Conduct unbecoming an officer and gentleman Article 134-General article Paragraph 61 -(Abusing public animal) Paragraph 62 -(Adultery) Paragraph 63 -(Assault-incident) Paragraph 64 -(Assault-with intent to commit murder, voluntary manslaughter, rape, robbery, sodomy, arson, burglary, or housebreaking) Paragraph 65 -(Bigamy) Paragraph 66 -(Bribery and graft) Paragraph 67 -(Burning with intent to defraud) Paragraph 68 -(Check, worthless, making and uttering-by dishonorably failing to maintain funds) Paragraph 69 -(Cohabitation, wrongful) Paragraph 70 -(Correctional custody-offenses against) Paragraph 71 -(Debt, dishonorably failing to pay) Paragraph 72 -(Disloyal statements) Paragraph 73 -(Disorderly conduct, drunkenness) Paragraph 74 -(Drinking liquor with prisoner) Paragraph 75 -(Drunk prisoner) Paragraph 76 -(Drunkenness-incapacitation for performance of duties through prior wrongful indulgence in intoxicating liquor or any drug) Paragraph 77 -(False or unauthorized pass offenses) Paragraph 78 (False pretenses, obtaining services under) Paragraph 79 (False swearing) Paragraph 80 (Firearm, discharging through negligence) Paragraph 81 (Firearm, discharging willfully, under such circumstances as to endanger human life) Paragraph 82 (Fleeing scene of accident) Paragraph 83 (Fraternization)

PUNITIVE ARTICLES UCMJ Article 134 Paragraph 84 (Gambling with subordinate) Paragraph 85 (Homicide, negligent) Paragraph 86 (Impersonating a commissioned, warrant, noncommissioned, or petty officer, or an agent of official) Paragraph 87 (Indecent acts of liberties with a child) Paragraph 88 (Indecent exposure) Paragraph 89 (Indecent language) Paragraph 90 (Indecent acts with another) Paragraph 91 (Jumping from vessel into the water) Paragraph 92 (Kidnapping) Paragraph 93 (Mail: taking, opening, secreting, destroying, or stealing) Paragraph 94 (Mails: depositing or causing to be deposited obscene matters in) Paragraph 95 (Misprison of serious offense) Paragraph 96 (Obstructing justice) Paragraph 97 (Pandering and prostitution) Paragraph 98 (Perjury: subornation of)Paragraph 99 (Public record: altering, concealing, removing, mutilating, obliterating, or destroying) Paragraph 100 (Quarantine: medicle, breaking) Paragraph 101 (Requesting commission of an offence) Paragraph 102 (Restriction, breaking) Paragraph 103 (Seizure: destruction, removal, or disposal of property to prevent) Paragraph 104 (Sentinel or lookout: offences against or by) Paragraph 105 (Soliciting another to commit an offense) Paragraph 106 (Stolen property: knowingly receiving, buying, concealing) Paragraph 107 (Straggling) Paragraph 108 (Testify: wrongful refusal) Paragraph 109 (Threat or hoax: bomb) Paragraph 110 (Threat, communicating) Paragraph 111 (Unlawful entry) Paragraph 112 (Weapon: concealed, carrying) Paragraph 113 (Wearing unauthorized insignia, decoration, badge, ribbon, device, or lapel button) NOTES NOTES NOTES

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