Integrating History and English Content

Integrating History and English Content

Virginia Department of Education Comprehensive Literacy: Best Practices for Elementary Reading Blocks Webinar Fall 2019 1 Agenda

Welcome and Introductions What Research Says 2017 English Standards of Learnin and VDOE Updates

Panel Discussion Dr. Tammy Milby, University of Richmond Director of Reading Lori Wall, Director of Elementary Curriculum, Newport News Public Schools 2 Questions from the Field

Chat Feature Use the chat feature to pose any questions to the group. We will collect these and add additional information as necessary to the presentation before slides are mailed out. 3 8VAC20-131-80. Instructional Program in Elementary Schools.

B. In kindergarten through grade 3, reading, writing, spelling, and mathematics shall be the focus of the instructional program. 4 C. To provide students with sufficient opportunity to learn, local school divisions shall provide a minimum of 680 hours of the required 990 hours of instructional time to students in elementary school in

the four academic disciplines of English, mathematics, science, and history and social science. 22.1-253.13:1. Standard 1. Instructional programs supporting the Standards of Learning and other educational objectives. The Board shall seek to ensure that the Standards of Learning are consistent with a high-quality foundation educational program. The Standards of Learning shall include, but not be limited to, the basic skills of communication (listening, speaking, reading,

and writing); computation and critical reasoning, including problem solving and decision making; proficiency in the use of computers and related technology; computer science and computational thinking, including computer coding; and the skills to manage personal finances and to make sound financial decisions. 5 The English Standards of Learning for reading

in kindergarten through grade three shall be based on components of effective reading instruction, to include, at a minimum, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary development, and text comprehension. What Research Says (1 of 4) Foundational Skills to Support Reading for Understanding in Kindergarten Through 3rd Grade Practice Guide: Recommendation 1- Teach students academic Recommendation 3- Teach students to decode language skills, including the use of

words, analyze word parts, and write and inferential and narrative language, and recognize words. vocabulary knowledge. Recommendation 2- Develop awareness of the segments of sound in speech and how they link to letters. 6 Recommendation 4- Ensure that each student reads connected text every day to support

reading accuracy, fluency, and comprehension. Foorman, B., Beyler, N., Borradaile, K., Coyne, M., Denton, C. A., Dimino, J., Furgeson, J., Hayes, L., Henke, J., Justice, L., Keating, B., Lewis, W., Sattar, S., Streke, A., Wagner, R., & Wissel, S. (2016). Foundational skills to support reading for understanding in kindergarten through 3rd grade (NCEE 2016-4008). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance (NCEE), Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved from the NCEE website: http://whatworks.ed.gov. What Research Says (2 of 4) Teaching Elementary School Students to be Effective Writers Practice Guide: Recommendation 1-Provide daily time for students to write.

Recommendation 3- Teach students to become fluent with handwriting, spelling, sentence construction, typing, and word processing. Recommendation 2- Teach students to use the Recommendation 4- Create an engaged community of writers. writing process for a variety of purposes. 7 Graham, S., Bollinger, A., Booth Olson, C., DAoust, C., MacArthur, C., McCutchen, D., & Olinghouse, N.(2012).Teaching elementary school students to be

effective writers: A practice guide (NCEE 2012- 4058). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/ wwc/publications_reviews.aspx#pubsearch. What Research Says (3 of 4) Phonics instruction is an essential part of early reading and writing instruction. Students need to learn how to efficiently decode words to increase their word recognition skills. The more words students recognize automatically, the better their reading fluency, which has a powerful effect on their comprehension of text. And thats the point. Phonics instruction

is designed to increase students ability to read and make meaning from text. 8 Students progress at a much faster rate in phonics when the bulk of instructional time is spent on applying the skills to authentic reading and writing experiences, rather than isolated skill-and-drill work. At least half of a phonics lesson should be devoted to application exercises. For students who are below level, the

amount of reading during phonics instruction must be even greater. International Literacy Association. (2019). Meeting the challenges of early literacy phonics instruction [Literacy leadership brief]. Newark, DE: Author What Research Says (4 of 4) Characteristics of strong phonics instruction: Explicit and systematic Word Awareness

Readiness Skills High-Frequency Words Scope and Sequence Reading Connected Text Blending Building vocabulary and background

knowledge Dictation 9 International Literacy Association. (2019). Meeting the challenges of early literacy phonics instruction [Literacy leadership brief]. Newark, DE: Author Virginia Department of Education 2017 Standards (1 of 3) New Communication Strand- Grades K-3 Formerly Oral Language New Communication and Multimodal Literacies strand focuses on:

Building communication skills Ask questions; collaborate with partners or groups Strengthening early oral literacy skills Retell stories; participate in creative dramatics Developing presentation skills Speak clearly; organize ideas; create a simple presentation using multimodal tools 10 Virginia Department of Education 2017 Standards (2 of 3) Now called Communication & Multimodal Literacies

Integrates multiple modes of communication and expression, digital citizenship, and current best practices Encourages options such as podcasts, presentations with visuals and media, blogs, etc Expands collaboration, consensus-building, teambuilding, and working toward common goals 11 Virginia Department of Education 2017 Standards (3 of 3) Reorganization of important phonological and phonemic awareness skills formerly under an Oral Language Strand (K-2)

These skills provide the foundation for literacy and must be included in classroom instruction Moved to Reading Strand: Identify and produce rhymes; manipulate syllables; blend and segment phonemes 12 Virginia Department of Education Curriculum Framework 13

Virginia Department of Education CF Kindergarten Reading 14 Virginia Department of Education CF First Grade Reading 15 Panelist Discussion on Structuring a Reading Block Participants: Dr. Tammy Milby, University of Richmond Director of Reading

Lori Wall, Director of Elementary Curriculum, Newport News City 16 Schools Panelist Questions University Dr. Tammy Milby, University of Richmond 17

Panelist Questions: 1)What are the essentials to an elementary literacy block? 2) Describe what the reading/writing connection should look like within an elementary literacy block? 3) What one piece advice can you provide for a new teacher who might be structuring a literacy block on their own for the first time? 4) What does differentiated instruction look like? What are the students/teacher doing? 5) In what ways have you worked to incorporate the recommendations from the IES practice guides into your work with prospective teachers? 18

Pathway to Successful Literacy LITERACY DR. TAMMY M. MILBY, DIRECTOR OF READING, UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND 19 ESSENTIALS DURING THE LANGUAGE ARTS BLOCK & READING / WRITING CONNECTIONS

20 Time Spend time on relevant academic tasks Value opportunities for real reading and writing Integrate reading and writing across the content areas & SOL strands Aim for what you desire- more minutes per day focused on literacy! Primary- 120 minutes (90 is a minimum) Upper Grades- 90 minutes (60 is really a minimum)

21 Physical Space How does the classroom arrangement support literacy? How meaningful is the print around the room? Does the classroom include: Literacy focused centers or stations? choices? Word wall words at eye level? Anchor charts and visuals created with learners? Spaces appropriate for lessons and independent work? Published student work and writing?

22 Access to Literature Select high quality literature Balance fiction and informational texts Utilize diverse texts across genres Include all kinds of print (magazines, newspapers, source documents, pamphlets, references, menus) Volume (more minutes of reading can help to raise achievement) Interactive Read Alouds and Think Alouds = promote comprehension

23 Instruction Whole Class Build Community Strategy Focus (Variety) Small Groups and Independent Reading Provide for individual differences & extra help Use data to determine specific needs and make groups flexible Intervention (appropriate level of challenge) People are a resource, who is most skilled to support the learner?

24 Motivation Motivation has a significant impact on students learning (Pressley, 2001) Affective factors build engagement: Foster a positive & encouraging environment with high expectations Is the task worthwhile? Is it interesting? Are students challenged? Cooperation is encouraged (lively and enthusiastic work space) Hands-on learning and manipulatives are used for learning goals

Well-established routines and procedures 25 How do you think reading and writing are connected? 26 Tips 27

Advice for ALLBut Especially NEW Teachers! Think Aloud & Model for Students Use Literature Whenever Possible Get to Know Your Learners & Build Relationships 28 Differentiation

Think about the needs of all learners (including those needing extra help, those on level, and higher achieving readers) Use a variety of literature and vary groups Think about an up front/proactive approach to differentiation (UDL) Can you engage in a different way? choice, text, authentic task, visuals or hands-on? Can you vary the approach to teaching content? 29 Research Into Practice

We do lots of work on fluency (including reading with expression) to build confidence & automaticity Choral and Echo Reading Repeated Text Readings (Voices, Phrases) Readers Theatre 30 Panelist Questions Local Lori Wall, Director of Elementary Curriculum,

Newport News Public 31 Panelist Question One: What are the essentials to the elementary literacy block? 32 Response One from Panelist: 5 components of effective reading instruction (phonemic awareness,

phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension) 4 skills of communication (speaking, listening, reading and writing) Integration Across the Day Choice and Voice Application through Real World Experiences 33 Panelist Question Two: In what ways have you worked to incorporate the

recommendations from the IES practice guides into the elementary literacy block? 34 Response Two from Panelist: Switch to a Code-Based Approach to literacy instruction in grades K-2 Implementation of Daily PPAC in Kindergarten and First Grade Explicit phonemic awareness instruction in small group instruction for Emergent and Beginning Learners Systematic and explicit handwriting instruction

Explicit and systematic phonics and spelling instruction Use of decodable text to apply decoding strategies learned Writers Workshop Model 35 Panelist Question Three: What does differentiated instruction look like? Describe students daily routines? 36

Response Three from Panelist: Understanding and Using: Balanced assessment approach (diagnostic, formative, and summative) Developmental Reading Continuum Explicit instruction to address skill areas, like phonemic awareness, phonics and vocabulary Grade level material with the appropriate scaffolds 37 Panelist Question Four:

Describe how the reading/writing connection has been incorporated into students daily experiences. 38 Response Four from Panelist: Reciprocity between our Reading and Writing units of study Use of Reader Response Journal Studied the work of Jennifer Serravallo, Understanding Texts and Readers and Reading Conferences

Literature Circles/Book Clubs Celebrations/Presentations at the end of each writing unit Performance-Based Assessments Use of technology: Nearpod, FlipGrid and Seesaw to name just a few 39 Panelist Question Five: What suggestions can you offer for divisions who are reworking

their elementary literacy blocks to be efficient and effective? 40 Response Five from Panelist: Do Your Research Audit Your Practices Analyze Your Data

41 Sample Literacy Block 42 Professional Research Meeting the Challenges of Early Literacy Phonics Instruction Foundational Skills to Support Reading for Understanding in Kin dergarten Through 3 rd Grade

Teaching Elementary School Students to Be Effective Writers 43 VDOE Disclaimer Reference within this presentation to any specific commercial or noncommercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer or otherwise does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the Virginia Department of

Education. 44 Reference within this presentation to any specific commercial or non-commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer or otherwise does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the Virginia Department of Education. Stay Connected Jill Nogueras K-12 English Coordinator [email protected]

Carmen Kurek Elementary English/Reading Specialist [email protected] Taylor Snow English/History & Social Science Specialist [email protected] Assessment Office [email protected]

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