Cooking Merit Badge

Cooking Merit Badge

Based on BSA 2016 Requirements Cooking Merit Badge Troop 88 - Gilbert, AZ Week 1 & 2 Nutrition Nutrition Do the following: a. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, give five examples for EACH of the following food groups, the recommended number of daily servings, and the recommended serving size:1. Fruits2. Vegetables3.

Grains4. Proteins5. Dairy b. Explain why you should limit your intake of oils and sugars. c. Determine your daily level of activity and your caloric need based on your activity level. Then, based on the MyPlate food guide, discuss with your counselor an appropriate meal plan for yourself for one day. d. Discuss your current eating habits with your counselor and what you can do to eat healthier, based on the MyPlate food guide. e. Discuss the following food label terms: calorie, fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrate, dietary fiber, sugar, protein. Explain how to calculate total carbohydrates and nutritional values for two servings, based on the serving size specified on the label. NUTRITION

MyPlate Checklist Calculator NUTRITION MyPlate Meal Planning Fruits Vegetables Grains Proteins Dairy

Lets see how we did on our sack lunches today Discussion does your sack lunch meet the myplate guidelines? NUTRITION NUTRITION Carbohydrates Good vs. Bad NUTRITION Protein Good vs. Bad NUTRITION

Saturated fats occur naturally in many foods. The majority come mainly from animal sources, including meat and dairy products. Examples are fatty beef, lamb, pork, poultry with skin, beef fat (tallow), lard and cream, butter, cheese and other dairy products made from whole or reduced-fat (2 percent) milk. These foods also contain dietary cholesterol. In addition, many baked goods and fried foods can contain high levels of saturated fats. Some plant foods, such as palm oil, palm kernel oil and coconut oil, also contain primarily saturated fats, but do not contain cholesterol.

NUTRITION Trans fats (or trans fatty acids) are created in an industrial process that adds hydrogen to liquid vegetable oils to make them more solid. Another name for trans fats is partially hydrogenated oils." Look for them on the ingredient list on food packages. Trans fats can be found in many foods but especially in fried foods like French fries and doughnuts, and baked goods including pastries, pie crusts, biscuits, pizza dough, cookies, crackers, and stick margarines and shortenings. You can also spot trans fats by reading ingredient

lists and looking for the ingredients referred to as partially hydrogenated oils. NUTRITION Dietary Fiber Sodium Naturally occurring sodium is in foods such as celery, beets and milk. Packaged and prepared foods, like canned soups, lunch meats and frozen dinners, often have sodium added during manufacturing. This sodium might be in the form of salt or other forms of sodium (like baking soda) that show up in our food.

NUTRITION Fruit and Vegetables 5 servings per day of fruit and veggies 5 different colors should be the goal At least one serving should be green Fruit contains sugar although it is natural sugar. 2 servings per day is usually enough. Vegetables should be half of the content of your plate NUTRITION Sugar

4 grams of sugar = 1 teaspoon of sugar Human body is only designed to handle 16 to 20 grams per day Average child or teen in U.S. consumes 40 to 80 teaspoons of sugar per day 1 official serving size of Cheerios has 10 grams of sugar NUTRITION Why sugar is a problem Body cannot process more than 16-20 grams per day Too much overloads the pancreas, and burns up

the ability to produce insulin Sugar and processed carbs show up as triglycerides when cholesterol is checked Diabetes then develops 40% of diabetics have significantly shortened lifespan due to stroke, kidney failure and heart attack 4 grams = 1 teaspoon NUTRITION Sugar Facts 8 ounces (1 cup) of sweetened drink per day will result in 15 lbs of excess weight gain per year (Soda, tea, vitamin water, gatorade, etc)

The average school lunch contains 20 teaspoons (80 grams) of sugar. Breakfast is even worse There is no such thing as store bought healthy yogurt. Todays mass produced yogurt is simply ice cream Artificial sweeteners have even more side effects and cause as many or more problems than sugar. NUTRITION Calories Calories are used to measure the amount of energy potential in foods

Humans need calories to produce energy in the same way that a fire needs wood to produce heat Calories are burned by all activities even sleeping and breathing Heavy or strenuous activity burns more calories than sedentary activity NUTRITION In general calorie requirements are around 2200 calories per day for most older teens and adults (males). Females require a little less, young and growing kids need more.

In any given day, calories should be 40% from protein 30% from carbohydrate 30% from fat Not enough calories = excess weight loss Too many calories = excess weight gain Rate of burn for different calories slow burning is

usually preferred over fast burning, except during heavy bursts of activity. Sometimes you need both! NUTRITION Activities which increase calorie needs: Cold weather More fat calories Hot food and drinks so the body doesnt have to burn so many calories to maintain warmth Endurance activities Protein, slow and fast burning carbohydrates Short high intensity activities Protein, fast burning carbohydrates

NUTRITION Calculating Calorie Needs There are a number of complex formulas for determining caloric needs Several things play a role Age Weight & Height Level of activity Multiple calculators available on internet Average teen male needs 2000 to 2400 calories a day for low to moderate activity

NUTRITION Electrolytes When sweating people need more of the following: Sodium Magnesium Potassium Without electrolytes your heart and muscles will not work properly Replacing water alone is not enough too little electrolytes and too much with water is a dangerous combination If it is windy or very dry, you may even not know that you are sweating

In hot or arid weather, alternate every other bottle of water with a bottle of electrolyte solution NUTRITION How to read food labels See Handout NUTRITION

Putting it all together Individually Plan 1 meal on the myplate worksheets In small groups Plan 2 meals on the myplate worksheet Discuss the meals you have planned with your group Give and receive feedback to other group members about the meal plans NEXT Need a couple of volunteers to do the following for the next meeting:

With your parents permission, visit www.calorieking.com Have them sign you up for a free 7 day trial Using calorie king, keep a diary of the foods you eat and the exercise you do for the next 7 days Be sure and log the little extras like butter, dressing etc. Bring a print out of the diary with you to the next classroom session (The diary itself is not a requirement for the merit badge, but we will use it to take a look at our usual eating habits and compare it

to healthy eating) Week 3 Health & Safety Health & Safety Do the following: a. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in cooking activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards. b. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while preparing meals and eating, including burns and scalds, cuts,

choking, and allergic reactions. c. Describe how meat, fish, chicken, eggs, dairy products, and fresh vegetables should be stored, transported, and properly prepared for cooking. Explain how to prevent cross-contamination. d. Discuss with your counselor food allergies, food intolerance, and food-related illnesses and diseases. Explain why someone who handles or prepares food needs to be aware of these concerns. e. Discuss with your counselor why reading food labels is important. Explain how to identify common allergens such as peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, and shellfish. SAFETY Likely Hazards

Cuts Burns & Scalds Choking Allergic Reactions Food Borne Illness Know first aid for all of them but SAFETY The first step in first aid is prevention If you are the grub master how might you prevent the following? Choking

Burns & Scalds Cuts Allergic Reactions Food borne illness SAFETY Stove Safety Never use or light near, or in, a tent or enclosed area Maintain stoves to mfg specifications. Store fuel only in approved containers Allow hot stoves to cool before storing, etc. Never leave a lighted stove unattended

Do not overload with large or overly full pot Use pot grabbers to pick up hot items SAFETY Common food allergens: Peanuts often life threatening Tree Nuts Eggs Shellfish Milk Wheat Soy

SAFETY Food Borne Illness Almost always preventable Most often caused by improper storage, handling or cooking of food products, Inadequate HAND WASHING, or cleaning of utensils or surfaces Most commonly associated with meat, seafood, eggs, dairy products, and produce SAFETY Raw Meat & Dairy must be kept cold Less than 40 degrees Fahrenheit Meat should be cooked soon after removing from

refrigeration Cooked food should be kept hot above 140 degrees Fahrenheit Keep COLD foods COLD, and HOT foods HOT USE A FOOD THERMOMETER IF IN DOUBT SAFETY Check seals on food in jars, containers or bags Freeze raw meat if it will not be used within 2 days. Discard leftovers if not eaten within three days Keep raw meat separate from other foods

WASH HANDS frequently while cooking SAFETY Parasitic diseases Worms and little critters http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/az/index.html Bacterial diseases Microscopic single celled organisms Viral diseases Subcellular, or prion particle Uses host organisms cells to live

SAFETY Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) Contaminated water, raw or unpasteurized milk and raw or undercooked meats, poultry, or seafood. Symptoms Diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, headache and fever. Symptoms may appear 2-5 days after exposure and last 5-7 days.

Prevention Properly cook chicken, meat and seafood to a safe internal temperature. Consume only pasteurized milk and juice and water that comes from trusted sources. WASH HANDS with soap and warm water, and scrub under fingernails after using the SAFETY Botulism A deadly disease caused by failure to maintain food at proper temperatures, in properly sealed containers Symptoms

dry mouth, double vision, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, sore throat, dizziness, constipation, muscle weakness, muscle paralysis, difficulty swallowing and breathing Prevention never use food from bulging containers/cans, strange odor or appearance, refrigerate leftovers quickly, and reheat all refrigerated leftover foods to proper temperature SAFETY Cryptosporidium Drinking water, recreational water (lakes, public

pools and hot tubs) and contaminated foods. Symptoms Dehydration, diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fever and weight loss. Symptoms may appear 2-10 days after exposure and last 7-14 days. Prevention WASH HANDS with soap and warm water, and scrub under fingernails before and after handling raw food. Wash all fruits and vegetables. Avoid water that may be contaminated and do not drink from swimming pools or

SAFETY Escherichia Coli Enteritis (E. Coli) Bacteria present in human poop, can be transmitted from one person to another, can be a deadly illness for elderly adults and young children. Symptoms nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. Prevention WASH HANDS after using restroom or after handling raw produce Refrigerate foods below 44 degrees

Wash all fresh produce SAFETY Hepatitis Hepatitis A virus can be present in human poop Symptoms Fever, Fatigue, Loss of appetite, Nausea, Vomiting, Abdominal pain, Grey-colored stools, Dark urine, Joint pain, Jaundice Prevention A vaccine can prevent this disease WASH HANDS with soap and warm water, and scrub under fingernails prior to handling

food Cook shellfish thoroughly Drink water from approved sources only Keep bathrooms clean and disinfected SAFETY Listeria monocytogenes Causes deadly infection listeriosis, spread from contaminated ready to eat foods like, hot dogs, deli meats, fermented or dry sausages, soft cheeses and raw foods (meat, poultry, seafood, fresh fruits, and vegetables) Symptoms

Fever, muscle aches and sometimes nausea or diarrhea Prevention Avoid exposure to raw meat, poultry and seafood WASH HANDS with soap and warm water, and scrub under fingernails prior to handling food SAFETY Norovirus Highly contagious virus found in contaminated

food, water and surfaces. Also found in human waste such as vomit. Symptoms Diarrhea, vomiting and stomach pain. Symptoms usually appear in 12-72 hours Prevention Frequently WASH HANDS with soap and warm water, and scrub under fingernails prior to handling food Keep work surfaces and knives clean Thoroughly wash fruits and vegetables and heat food thoroughly Thoroughly wash clothes of persons that

SAFETY Salmonella Enteritis Bacteria found in uncooked eggs, poultry, vegetables, and fruit. Symptoms nausea, vomiting, fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, dehydration, weakness and loss of appetite. Prevention Thoroughly cook food Wash all fruit and vegetables Wipe and sanitize all surfaces after contact

with meat Clean all utensils after using WASH HANDS before, between, and after handling of food products SAFETY Staphylococcal Enteritis Bacteria present in environment. Multiplies in warm temperatures, thrives on protein. Symptoms nausea, diarrhea, headache, fever, chills, weakness and dizziness. Prevention

Thoroughly cook food Maintain food at proper temperatures Clean all utensils after using WASH HANDS before and after handling food SAFETY Trichinosis Caused by parasitic worm Trichinella Spiralis. Larvae can remain alive in humans for years. Parasite passed to humans by eating undercooked or raw meat infected with the parasite.

Symptoms Stomach ache, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. This occurs within one week of digesting the parasite. Usually from pork. Prevention Cook meats all the way through, especially pork. SAFETY Norovirus Highly contagious virus found in contaminated food, water and surfaces. Also found in human waste such as vomit.

Symptoms Diarrhea, vomiting and stomach pain. Symptoms usually appear in 12-72 hours Prevention Frequently WASH HANDS with soap and warm water, and scrub under fingernails prior to handling food Keep work surfaces and knives clean Thoroughly wash fruits and vegetables and heat food thoroughly Thoroughly wash clothes of persons that SAFETY

PROPER HANDWASHING Water temp is not important, friction is Wet hands Apply Soap Lather and scrub hands, including under nails and between fingers and at the same time Start saying the alphabet at a relaxed pace When you get to the letter Z, rinse and dry Week 4 Cooking Basics & Careers

BASICS OF COOKING Four Parts to the Cooking Merit Badge Safety Nutrition Planning Preparation Cooking Basics Do the following: a. Discuss EACH of the following cooking methods. For each one, describe the equipment needed, how temperature control is maintained, and name at least one food that can be cooked using that method: baking, boiling, broiling, pan

frying, simmering, steaming, microwaving, grilling, foil cooking, and use of a Dutch oven. b. Discuss the benefits of using a camp stove on an outing vs. a charcoal or wood fire. c. Describe with your counselor how to manage your time when preparing a meal so components for each course are ready to serve at the same time. Food Related Careers Do the following: a. Find out about three career opportunities in cooking. Select one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Cooking at Home Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for three full days of meals (three breakfasts, three lunches, and three dinners) plus one dessert. Your menu should include enough to feed yourself and at least one adult, keeping in mind any special needs (such as food allergies) and how you kept your foods safe and free from cross-contamination. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals. Then do the following: a. Create a shopping list for your meals showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal. b. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor. c. Using at least five of the 10 cooking methods from requirement 3, prepare and serve yourself and at least one adult (parent, family member, guardian, or other responsible adult) one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, and one dessert from

the meals you planned. d. Time your cooking to have each meal ready to serve at the proper time. Have an adult verify the preparation of the meal to your counselor. e. After each meal, ask a person you served to evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your meals. Tell how better planning and Camp Cooking Do the following: a. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for your patrol (or a similar size group of up to eight youth, including you) for a camping

trip. Your menu should include enough food for each person, keeping in mind any special needs (such as food allergies) and how you keep your foods safe and free from cross-contamination. These five meals must include at least one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, AND at least one snack OR one dessert. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals. b. Create a shopping list for your meals showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal. c. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor. d. In the outdoors, using your menu plan for this requirement, cook two of the five meals you planned using either a lightweight stove or a low-impact fire. Use a different cooking method from requirement 3 for each meal. You must also cook a third meal using either a Dutch oven OR a foil pack OR kabobs. Serve all of these meals to your patrol or a group of youth.

e. In the outdoors, prepare a dessert OR a snack and serve it to your patrol or a group of youth. f. After each meal, have those you served evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, and then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your meals. Tell how planning and preparation help ensure successful outdoor cooking. g. Explain to your counselor how you cleaned the equipment, utensils, and the cooking Trail and Backpacking Meals Do the following: a. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for trail hiking or backpacking that includes one breakfast, one lunch, one

dinner, and one snack. These meals must not require refrigeration and are to be consumed by three to five people (including you). Be sure to keep in mind any special needs (such as food allergies) and how you will keep your foods safe and free from cross-contamination. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals. b. Create a shopping list for your meals, showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal. c. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor. Your plan must include how to repackage foods for your hike or backpacking trip to eliminate as much bulk, weight, and garbage as possible. d. While on a trail hike or backpacking trip, prepare and serve two meals and a snack from the menu planned for this requirement. At least one of those meals must be cooked over a fire, or an approved trail stove (with proper supervision).

e. After each meal, have those you served evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your meals. Tell how planning and preparation help ensure successful trail hiking or backpacking meals. f. Discuss how you followed the Outdoor Code and no-trace principles during your outing. Explain to your counselor how you cleaned any equipment, utensils, and PLANNING What to cook and how much What equipment is needed What safety concerns are present How much time is available

How much cleanup is needed Nutritional considerations Food allergies in group Proper food storage Timing of meal WHAT ELSE MIGHT YOU WANT TO CONSIDER? PLANNING There are many considerations when planning a meal especially when cooking for a larger group Use of Troop meal planning worksheet Seasonings

Sugar Dish Soap Charcoal 6: 7: 8: 9: SUNDAY BREAKFAST SATURDAY DINNER

SATURDAY LUNCH Scoutmaster Signature: Drink: Side(s): Main Course: Drink: Side(s):

Main Course: Drink: Side(s): Main Course: Drink: Side(s):

Main Course: Ziploc Bags 5: SATURDAY BREAKFAST Garbage Bags 4: HAVE

SHOPPING LIST NEED GROCERY LIST THE SCOUTMASTER HAS APPROVED THIS PLAN AS IS! FOOD BUYERS - DO NOT SUBSTITUTE Aluminum Foil 3:

STAPLES Paper Towels MENU ATTENDANCE APL: PL: CAMPOUT LOCATION:

PATROL NAME: The patrol leader is responsible for getting patrol meal money from the treasurer, shopping along with the rest of the patrol and getting patrol food to the campsite. CAMPOUT DATE: PATROL: Boy Scout Troop 88 - Patrol Meal Planning Worksheet PLANNING Take only what is needed. Measure food quantity ahead of time.

Prep (Slice, chop etc. ) food before going. Repackage foods to reduce trash. Use zip top bags to limit space/remove air. Check to make sure you have all the ingredients Pack food so each meal is easily accessible. Stay organized. Do not forget to pack the cooking gear PLANNING Outdoor Code and Leave No Trace The Outdoor Code As an American, I will do my best to Be clean in my outdoor manners Be careful with fire

Be considerate in the outdoors, and Be conservation minded. How does this impact the kind of meals and cooking methods you will use outdoors? DISCUSSION The cobra patrol is going on a backpacking trip. The GM has decided he wants to make fried chicken for dinner. What are the potential problems?

How can they be prevented? After giving it some thought, he decided instead to make chicken in foil packets What are the potential problems? How can they be prevented?

What will make this meal more filling? How can it be made easer, lighter, faster? DISCUSSION Mark made tuna salad and peanut butter cookies for a picnic to be held outdoors at a park. The weather is very warm as it is summer. It will be a couple of

hours before people get to eat the salad as they are busy doing activities What are the potential problems? How can they be prevented? DISCUSSION You have a group of 4 campers for this weekends campout. There is a burn ban in place. The weather is cool, you will be hiking on rough terrain and carrying all of your gear and food into the site. The weather is expected to be about 55 during the day. You only have one stove burner, and only one pot to

cook in. Using the meal planning worksheet, plan 3 meals for your group Discuss with the class why your groups plan is a good meal plan for this activity How could this meal plan be made Lighter Faster to cook

Cheaper PREPARATION 7 Methods of cooking needed for merit badge Baking Boiling Pan frying Simmering Steaming Microwaving

Grilling Of course there are others such as sautee, braise, roast, deep fry, but these 7 should be the focus PREPARATION Stoves vs Wood Fire Advantages of wood fire cooking Disadvantages of wood fire cooking Advantages of stoves Disadvantages of stoves PREPARATION

Outdoor Code and Leave No Trace Keeping the Outdoor Code and Leave No trace in mind How can you reduce the environmental impact of the cooking method? How can you reduce the environmental impact of packaging ?

How are dishes done at Philmont? SAFETY Off to the kitchen to prepare a snack! GloGerm Experiment Scouts are divided into two teams Both teams powdered but Team 1 washes hands before powdering, after powdering and during food prep

Team 2 washes hands prior to powdering but not prior to or during prep View the results with black light PLANNING As a group, plan a menu for the next session to demonstrate the different cooking methods We will cook and eat this meal as a group Meal must meet MyPlate rules Group outing to shop for this meal @ grocery store

PLANNING Meal planning session Plan 3 full days of meals for home Plan 5 meals and one snack or desert for campouts Plan 1 breakfast, 1 lunch, 1 dinner and one snack for backpacking MERIT BADGE OVERVIEW Classroom Knowledge of food safety, nutrition, meal planning, preparation, and careers in culinary arts industry

Meal Planning, Prep, and Cooking 9 meals, all but 3 prepared outdoors 1 desert which can be done indoors or outdoors Outings Local market REQUIREMENT 1 Safety a) Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in cooking activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.

b) Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while preparing meals and eating, including burns and scalds, cuts, choking, and allergic reactions. c) Describe how meat, fish, chicken, eggs, dairy products, and fresh vegetables should be stored, transported, and properly prepared for cooking. Explain how to prevent cross-contamination. d) Discuss with your counselor food allergies, food intolerance, and food-related illnesses and diseases. Explain why someone who handles or prepares food needs to be aware of these concerns. e) Discuss with your counselor why reading food labels is important. Explain how to identify common allergens such as peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, and shellfish.

REQUIREMENT 2 Nutrition a) Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, give five examples for EACH of the following food groups, the recommended number of daily servings, and the recommended serving size: Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Proteins, and Dairy b) Explain why you should limit your intake of oils and sugars. c) Determine your daily level of activity and your caloric need based on your activity level. Then, based on the MyPlate food guide, discuss with your counselor an appropriate meal plan for yourself for one day. d) Discuss your current eating habits with your counselor and what you can do to eat healthier, based on the MyPlate food guide.

e) Discuss the following food label terms: calorie, fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrate, dietary fiber, sugar, protein. Explain how to calculate total carbohydrates and nutritional values for two servings, based on the serving size specified on the label. REQUIREMENT 3 Cooking basics Do the following: a) Discuss EACH of the following cooking methods. For each one, describe the equipment needed, how temperature control is maintained, and name at least one food that can be cooked using that method:

baking, boiling, broiling, pan frying, simmering, steaming, microwaving, grilling, foil cooking, and use of a Dutch oven. b) Discuss the benefits of using a camp stove on an outing vs. a charcoal or wood fire. c) Describe for your counselor how to manage your time when preparing a meal so components for each course are ready to serve at the correct time. REQUIREMENT 4 Plan, shop and prepare for yourself and at least

one other adult (Need not be consecutive) at home or other location Must use at least 5 of the 7 cooking methods 1 Breakfast 1 Lunch 1 Dinner 1 Dessert REQUIREMENT 5 Plan, shop and prepare for your Patrol or group while outdoors On approved stove or campfire

2 Meals Using Dutch oven, foil pack or kabobs 1 Meal REQUIREMENT 6 Plan, shop and prepare for your Patrol or group while on a Trail hike or backpacking That dont have to be cooked (but can be) 2 meals Cooked on fire or approved trail stove 1 meal REQUIREMENT 7

Food Related Careers Find out about three career opportunities in cooking. Select one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

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