Clause combination

Clause combination

Clause combination IND + DEP definition A clause combination is a formula that characterizes a sentence. Every clause combination has three elements: The number of independent clauses in the sentence (IND); A plus sign (+); The number of dependent clauses in the sentence (DEP). Clause combination = IND + DEP

Every sentence has a clause combination with these three elements. IND+DEP The three elements of a clause combination always appear in this order: IND+DEP. In terms of clause combination, 1+2 2+1. How do two such sentences differ? The first sentence has only one independent clause (1+2) while the second has two (2+1). In addition, the first sentence has two dependent clauses (1+2) while the second has

just one (2+1). Maintaining the proper order of the elements is essential. How many clauses in a sentence? How does one determine the number of clauses in a sentence? Fact: Every clause has its own subject-verb combination. Number of clauses = number of subject-verb combinations To determine the number of clauses in a sentence,

identify the number of subject-verb combinations in the sentence. Once you know the number of subject-verb combinations, you know the number of clauses. Then you can determine the clause combination. Example 1 Consider this example: Every clause has its own subject-verb combination. How many subject-verb combinations appear in verb

this example?subject 1 clause (common noun) has Subject-verb combinations = 1 1 subject-verb combination = 1 clause: Every clause has its own subject-verb combination

Example 1: another view Example 2 Consider this example: At 8:00 a.m., Theo rinsed their bowls in the sink, placed the milk and juice back in the fridge, walked to the den, and kissed his mom on the cheek. (Grisham, 2011, p. 4) subject-verb combinations subject 1 Theo (proper

noun) verb rinsedplacedwalked kissed 1 subject-verb combination = 1 clause Example 2: another view Example 3 Consider this example: It was early spring and the air was crisp and

cool. (Grisham, 2011, p. 5) subject-verb combinations subject verb 1 It (pronoun) was 2 air (common noun)

was 2 subject-verb combinations = 2 clauses. clause 1 It was early spring 2 the air was crisp and cool Example 3: another view

Example 4 Consider this sentence: When she saw him she smiled and put a hand over her mouth. (Grisham, 2011, p. 7) subject-verb combinations subject verb 1 she (pronoun)

saw 2 she (pronoun) smiledput 2 subject-verb combinations = 2 clauses clause 1 When she saw him 2

she smiled and put a hand over her mouth Example 4: another view Example 5 Consider this sentence: She had moved to Strattenburg three years earlier when her husband, also from Cameroon, took a job at the local college where he taught languages. (Grisham, 2011, p. 17)

subject-verb combinations subject 1 She (pronoun) 2 husband (common noun) 3 he (pronoun) verb had moved took taught Example 5 (continued)

Consider this sentence: She had moved to Strattenburg three years earlier when her husband, also from Cameroon, took a job at the local college where he taught languages. (Grisham, 2011, p. 17) 3 subject-verb combinations = 3 clauses 1 2 3 clause

She had moved to Strattenburg three years earlier when her husband, also from Cameroon, took a job at the local college where he taught languages Example 5: another view Example 6 Consider this sentence: Some of her clients were from Central America, and when Theo saw them at the office

he was ready to practice. (Grisham, 2011, p. 17) subject-verb combinations subject verb 1 Some (pronoun) were 2 Theo (proper noun) saw 3 he (pronoun) was Example 6 (continued) Consider this sentence: Some of her clients were from Central

America, and when Theo saw them at the office he was ready to practice. (Grisham, 2011, p. 17) 3 subject-verb combinations = 3 clauses clause 1 Some of her clients were from Central America 2 when Theo saw them at the office 3 he was ready to practice Example 6: another view

Example 7 Consider this sentence: You have a crucial eyewitness whose testimony could potentially change the outcome of the trial, and you have one person who knows about this eyewitness. (Grisham, 2011, p. 186) subject-verb combinations subject verb 1 You (pronoun)

have 2 testimony (common noun) could change 3 you (pronoun) have

4 who (pronoun) knows Example 7 (continued) Consider this sentence: You have a crucial eyewitness whose testimony could potentially change the outcome of the trial, and you have one person who knows about this eyewitness. (Grisham, 2011, p. 186) 4 subject-verb combinations = 4 clauses clause

1 You have a crucial eyewitness 2 whose testimony could potentially change the outcome of the trial 3 you have one person

4 who knows about this eyewitness Example 7: another view Clause combination Every sentence has a clause combination. Clause combination = IND + DEP Maintaining the proper order of the elements is essential. In terms of clause combination, 1+2 2+1.

Number of clauses = number of subject-verb combinations Once you know the number of subject-verb combinations, you know the number of clauses. Then you can determine the clause combination. Clause combination = IND + DEP References Grisham, J. (2011). Theodore Boone: Kid lawyer. New York: Puffin Books.

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