Annotate For…

Annotate For…

Annotate For ANALYSIS: CHARACTERIZATION, SETTING, PATTERNS, SITUATIONAL DETAILS, FORESHADOWING, HUMORS IMPACT, POSSIBLE THEMES, SYMBOLISM, PLOT TWISTS/MOOD, CHARACTER DESCRIPTION STYLE: SPEECH, REPETITION, FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE, STYLE, DESCRIPTION, SYMBOLISM, UNKNOWN WORDS/VOCABULARY, DICTION PERSPECTIVE: IRONY, AMBIGUITY, CHARACTERIZATION, SPEECH OR DIALOGUE STRUCTURE: TIMING, PLOT TWISTS/MOOD, POSSIBLE THEMES, FORESHADOWING, REPETITION, AMBIGUITY QUESTIONS: THOUGHT PROVOKING INFORMATION, IRONY, UNKNOWN WORDS/VOCABULARY, AMBIGUITY Reading Question Forms: Multiple Choice Questions 1. Details might include characteristics of a person, place, or thing, or a particular date, others may ask you about subtly stated or minor details you have to look deeper for 4. Cause and Effect Relationships may ask you about the influence of different characters actions to evaluate or explain a process, information may be provided in the passage or have to be put together with the given details. 8. Sequence of Events determine order of information or when things occur in a passage. 2. Main Ideas determine the focus of a passage or a paragraph, or paragraphs in a passage. 5. Generalizations take a lot of

information and boil it down to a concise form. May involve interpreting mood, tone, or character, make a general observation or draw a conclusion. 7. Meaning of Words determine from content what a particular word, phrase, or statement means from how it is used or what information surrounds it. 3. Comparative Relationships ask you to make comparisons and contrasts in passages that contain multiple points of view. 6. Authors Voice and Structure voice relates to authors style, attitude, and point of view. Structure focuses on craft of writing, and main purpose of writing. YOU READ. AT H W D N A ST ER D N IMAGES TO HELP U D AN ES

R TU C PI G IN VISUALIZATION- US READ ABOUT WHAT VE A H U YO N IO AT M S BASED ON INFOR ES U G ED AT C U D E D G AN PREDICTION- MAKIN YOUR READING. IN T EX N N E PP A H L WIL

NOWLEDGE AND K RE O M N AI G P EL AT YOU READ TO H H W T U O B A S N IO ST ING QUE QUESTIONING- ASK DERSTANDING. HAVE A BETTER UN DERSTAND YOUR N U P EL H TO D EA R E NG WHAT YOU HAV TI A ST RE

R O G IN LL E SUMMARIZING- RET READING. COME UP IN AT H T S N IO AT TU SI ELATE TO IDEAS OR R TO S N O TI A TU SI NG REAL LIFE CONNECTIONS- USI YOUR READING. S E I G E T A R T S

G N I D REA What is the topic or subject of the text? What is the main idea? What are key details? What is the basic structure? What is explicitly known and what can be implicitly understood from the text? Are there any examples of sensory or figurative (e.g. metaphor) language? Questions to Use to Help Interpret a Reading Passage S.I.F.T. LITERARY ANALYSIS STRATEGY Title:________________________________ Author:__________________ Symbols Images Figurativ e Language Examine the title and text for symbolism. Identify images and sensory details

(sight, sound, taste, odor, texture). Identify and analyze non-standard use of language, including metaphor, simile, repetition, omission, unusual word order, slang, etc. Discuss the tone taken by the author. TWIST Tone: The attitude of the speaker toward the subject. Word Choice: The specific words and their connotations, associations, or emotional impact. Imagery: The sense impressions (sound, smell, sight, taste, and touch) Style: The authors use of language, including figurative language and poetic devices such as repetition, rhyme, and rhythm. Theme: The Authors insight about life. Thesis Statement: Your Response Textual Support Title: What do the words of the title suggest to you? What denotations are presented in the title? What connotations or associations do the words posses? Paraphrase: Translate the poem in your own words. What is the poem about?

Connotation: What meaning does the poem have beyond the literal meaning? Think about the things below Attitude: What is the speakers attitude? How does the speaker feel about himself, about others, and about the subject? What is the authors attitude? How does the author feel about the speaker, about other characters, about the subject, and the reader? Shifts: Where do the shifts in tone, setting, voice, etc. occur? Look for time and place, keywords, punctuation, stanza divisions, changes in length or rhyme, and sentence structure. What is the purpose of each shift? How do they contribute to effect and meaning? Title: Reanalyze the title on an interpretive level. What part does the title play in the overall interpretation of the poem? Theme: List the subjects and the abstract ideas in the poem. Then determine the overall theme. What message is the author trying to convey? What lesson is being taught? The DIDLS

Strategy for Tonal Analysis DIDLS is a strategy for analyzing tone. It usually applies to a written or oral text. WHAT IS TONE? Tone is the speakers attitude. It is the emotion that the author uses to communicate about the subject. The tone shows meaning that goes beyond the words in the story. D.U.C.A.T.S. The 6 gold pieces of writers voice Diction refers to a writers Unity refers to the idea Coherence refers to the (or speakers) word that all of the ideas in a organization and logic of choice written piece are relevant a piece of writing; and appropriate to the focus. Audience refers to the Tone refers to a writers ability to create an attitude toward the writers awareness of matter of a piece of writing. who will be reading his or subject What does that attitude suggest about the author? The subject? her piece of writing; What effect is produced by the writing and how is that effect produced? Syntax refers to the arrangement--the ordering, grouping, and

placement--of words within a phrase, clause, or sentence. OPTIC primary source visual analysis tool O P T I C Overview What is happening in the picture? Summarize the action of the visual without analyzing its meaning yet. Parts Break the picture down into sections. Describe the placement of objects on the canvas. Name everything that you see. Describe color, lighting, and movement in the picture. Title/Theme/ Tone What does the title tell you about the picture? How much does it add to what you understand or do not understand about the picture? Explain your answers. What themes does the picture reflect and in what ways? What is the authors attitude toward the subject? Use your tone worksheet! Interrelation Analyze the relationships in the picture. How do objects or people or colors relate to each other in the picture? What clues to the message or argument are these relationships giving you? What seems to be the most important relationship in the picture? Conclusion Draw a conclusion to the meaning or message of the picture based on

what you have viewed and discussed as a group. Essentially, what is the argument the artist is trying to convey? SOLLIDD Analyzing rhetorical elements and authors style Syntax Sentence structure The structure of sections within a passage and as a whole. Movement in the passage between tones, ideas, defining literary/rhetorical strategies Organization simile, personification, irony (situational, verbal and Literary Devices Metaphor, dramatic), hyperbole, allusion, alliteration, etc. Cultural levels of language act, with attendant traits (does the narrators voice represent a particular social, political, or cultural viewpoint or perspective?) Levels of Discourse Imagery Deliberate vivid appeal to the audiences understanding through the five senses (visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, gustatory) Detail Diction Word choice and its denotative and connotative significance Descriptive items selected for inclusion. Concrete aspects of the poem or passage. What is included; what is omitted

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